Passing the Torch: The New 992 Porsche 911 Targa

992 Targa Cover
Photo Credit: HERE

With the future models of 992 coming at us from every direction, the new Targa has been the only one viewed with no camouflage, indicating that it will likely be the next 992 to be officially revealed. The incoming GT3 and Turbo have both been out and about but the Targa has been running round the Nurburgring in a bright red color grabbing the attention of photographers camped out at the ‘ring.

Old Targa Back
Photo Credit: HERE

The only reason there even is a new Targa is because of its rich history. In 1973, Porsche was looking for ways to produce a convertible car that had structural rigidity in order to comply with the fickle American regulations for selling a convertible car on American soil. Porsche eagerly jumped to find a conclusion since the American market for convertibles was so massive. Eventually, the solution to their problem came to them in the form of the famous silver roll bar seen on early targa models. Zuffenhausen’s engineers learned that putting this roll bar in place of the B pillar would provide the required amount of rigidity while still being able to remove a section of the roof-the car was still a convertible. Porsche named this special 911 the “Targa” to celebrate their success in the Targa Florio race where driver Gijs van Lennep won the race in his Porsche 911 Carrera RSR. Yet another Porsche named after racing.

993 Targa Back
Photo Credit: HERE

However, Targas didn’t always have the roll bar we see today. The 993 and 996 generations had a Panoramic roof that stretched from the windshield all the way to the trunk. The 997 generation also had the panoramic roof but it was only available in the 4 and 4S trim levels.

997 Targa Top
Photo Credit: HERE

For the 991 generation, Porsche only offered the Targa on AWD trim models yet again but they also took the Targa back to its roots by bringing back the classic brushed aluminum roll bar and 3 gills. To cope with the times this new Targa had an automatic folding roof, with the rear glass window moving all the way up allowing the cloth to automatically fold behind the seats.

991 Targa Side
Photo Credit: HERE

That brings us back to the 992 Targa. Recently spotted at the Nurburgring, it is seen sporting the same brushed aluminum roll bar and gills as the 991 and is keeping the Targa tradition alive. However, one question remains. The Targa has always been heavier than the cabriolet, so will Porsche bring back the RWD Targa to save weight for the 992 generation? Only time will tell… Tell us what you think in the comments!

992 Targa Side
Photo Credit: HERE

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Hypercar Level Performance: The Gemballa Turbo S

991 Turbo S Cover

I would like to begin by thanking Cody (@cody23m) for providing his 911 Turbo S to support RS Report. When I received an invite to a prestige event called Cars and Jets, I scrambled to get a ride from supercar owners everywhere in SoCal. Cars and Jets is the only private super and hyper car show in the world. In the words of the founder, Steven Barth, “This event sets itself apart from the countless others by going back to the roots when owners got together and shared the passion for cars without having to deal with countless photographers, police, angry neighbors, and people looking for business opportunities when we just want to enjoy a Sunday with friends. Making owners and their personal guests the only attending creates a relaxing atmosphere that leads to great conversation and friendships. In the end that’s what makes the car scene the most fun.”

991 Turbo S Side

I humbly asked Cody if he would like to attend with his monster of a 911. May 11th was the best day of my life. Before the event, our crew met up in front of my house. When Cody pulled up, I ran outside to greet him and was confronted by, essentially, the German Batmobile. The bolt on wheel arches, the massive wing, the beautiful 3 piece Gemballa wheels, and the exposed carbon fiber engine vents just added to the overall effect of the car. Gemballa wasn’t messing around when it designed this masterpiece.

991 Turbo S Arches

As I climbed into the Gemballa Turbo S, nothing seemed out of the ordinary. It had a gorgeous red leather interior and even heated seats. It was like climbing into a comfortable bed that was conveniently placed on top a 950 horsepower, 900 lb/ft of torque monster. By Design extracted these hypercar level numbers on a low tune. That’s right, this thing can be cranked up even higher. There’s a methanol injection kit that converts 91 octane into 95 octane, but the car can run race gas if need be. The full spec sheet will be at the bottom of the article.
The startup was quiet, due to those massive turbos sucking in all of the glorious noises that flat 6 could’ve produced [Insert Anthony’s GT3RS article here].

991 Turbo S Interior

As we pulled onto the main road, I still couldn’t find the difference between Anthony’s 997 911 and this Turbo S. It wasn’t until Cody smashed that gas pedal all the way into the floor that I felt like I was either going to throw up, pass out, or die. I do have a phobia of roller coasters, and this car should’ve had a big fat warning label on the dashboard. I clutched my stomach as the view became blurrier and blurrier, and finally, a godsend. There was a red light. I couldn’t have imagined this car would accelerate that fast. I was at a loss for words, they couldn’t even begin to describe the magnitude of acceleration that this car can achieve.

991 Turbo S Rally

As we drove closer to the event, our crew encountered an insanely loud Gallardo Superleggera, which attempted to overtake us. Now, Gallardo Superleggeras are nothing to be joked about, but with one magical downshift, we accelerated to his overtaking speed in less than a second. Literally. As I tried to take out my phone to film, we encountered a stop sign, which approached us much, much faster than I could perceive. Now, this meant braking. Hard, hard braking. Never have I felt that many G forces pull on my body; If I didn’t have a seatbelt on, I would’ve undoubtedly flew out of the windshield. I felt my face begin to pull off in ways I’ve never felt before.

991 Turbo S Back.jpg

During the rally through Angeles Crest, the car still took corners flawlessly. This car might be extremely fast in a straight line, but it is still a 911, corners are its middle name. As we pulled to the side to regroup, people approached us excitedly to tell us that the Turbo S was shooting flames. That’s the least to be expected when Gemballa and By Design get their hands on a car. Those Turbos have to breathe somehow right?

991 Turbo S Front

What I experienced in this Gemballa Turbo S could be considered torture to some people, but I enjoyed every single second spent in that car, it was truly mind blowing. Thanks again to Cars and Jets for organizing this event and Cody for generously taking me to this event. This was truly the best day of my life by far, and I owe it all to them.
Here is the spec list:

991 Turbo S Spec List

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Why was the Porsche 911 Designed with a Rear Engine, Rear Wheel Drive Layout?

Old and New 911
Photo Credit: HERE

Have you ever heard of a sports car with an engine behind the rear axle? Immediately, the Porsche 911 comes to mind. I can’t think of another sports car with this layout off the top of my head. This iconic design has been a staple of the 911, since 1963. But what was the reason for this design?

Old and New 911 Side
Photo Credit: HERE

The reasoning was simple, Porsche believed it was the most practical way to build a sports car since a mid engined layout wasn’t suitable for having rear passengers or effective noise cancellation in the cabin. Vibrations from the engine would have been easily felt by all unfortunate enough to be inside the car.

Old and New 911 Diagonal
Photo Credit: HERE

By placing the Flat 6 behind the rear axles, there would be space for 2 small* rear passengers and luggage could fit in the large front trunk. Noise isolation and vibrations were easier to control by having the engine placed farther away from the cabin. Most importantly, traction was proven to be better than any other layout, because the weight of the engine on the rear axles helped the wheels keep steady contact with the road, hence why 911s are so quick off the line.

996 and 993
Photo Credit: HERE

However, 911 enthusiasts are very strict with what defines a “pure” 911. For example, when Porsche made the 996 water cooled unlike all previous air cooled 911s, people considered it to be the death of the 911 and don’t get me started on those fried egg headlights. Pricing of the 993 is continuing to skyrocket while the 996 might as well be the cheapest 911 money can buy, which is likely why the rear engine will stay with the 911 for the rest of its life.

991 GT2RS RS Report
Owner: @gt2urbo 

This seemingly unbalanced rear engine design has also been proven performance-wise with cars like the new 911 GT2RS setting lap records left and right; Porsche has shown that this odd layout can definitely compete with mid engined supercars. After 56 years of constant tweaking and evolution, Porsche has clearly perfected its signature rear engine, rear wheel drive design.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

 

 

The Legend of the Porsche Speedster Continues

 

Speedster 6
Photo Credit HERE

The production ready Porsche 911 Speedster is finally here! If you haven’t already, check out our article on the Porsche 911 Speedster Concept! It will help compare the differences between the production ready car versus what Porsche really wanted the Speedster to be. The production ready Speedster was finally revealed this week at the New York Auto Show.

Speedster 2
Photo Credit HERE

Unlike the 997 Speedster that was limited to 356 units to commemorate the first Speedster, the 356 Speedster, the 991.2 Speedster is limited to 1,948 units to commemorate the year the 356 Speedster was made, 1948. The new Speedster has the same engine as the beautifully sounding GT3 and GT3RS, a naturally aspirated 4.0 liter Flat 6 making 502 horsepower and 346 lb/ft of torque. Each cylinder has its own individual throttle bodies to improve throttle response (was it really that bad before?). Power is higher on this car to make up for the convertible to keep performance level with the GT3/RS.

Speedster 3
Photo Credit HERE

Paired to that amazing engine, is a 6 speed manual gearbox. No PDK option here everybody… rejoice! Air conditioning is not available as standard but can be added as an option, but who cares about that? Also, ceramic brakes come standard thank God. Did you want an automatic folding top? The Speedster sticks to its roots, with a manually operated top.

Speedster 4
Photo Credit HERE

The Talbot-shaped door mirrors we saw on the concept are not on the Speedster, probably because of some bogus pedestrian safety regulation. The same plain old 911 mirrors are fitted to this extremely special 911. Also, the center gas cap on the hood has been replaced with a regular gas cap on the fender. I believe that was because of practicality reasons; I wouldn’t want to scratch my paint at the gas station because the pump was touching my fender and hood.

Speedster Cover
Photo Credit HERE

Essentially, the concept was almost exactly the same as the production version, with only minimal changes to the car. This car is the perfect homage of the Speedster, back to basics with a 6 speed manual. If I had to own any 911, it would definitely be this one.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Aero, Aero, and More Aero: The Porsche 911 GT2RS MR

GT2RS MR Cover
Photo Credit: HERE

If you thought the Porsche 911 GT2RS was enough of a record breaker, think again. If you thought the Porsche 911 GT2RS was enough of a neck breaker, think again. If you think the Porsche 911 GT2RS was limited enough, think again. Presenting the Porsche 911 GT2RS MR, the car you get “when extreme isn’t extreme enough.”

991 GT2RS RS Report
Manthey Racing (MR) was started by Olaf Manthey back in 1996. Naturally, he set up shop near the Nürburgring, arguably one of the most influential and challenging race tracks in the world. He focused mainly on Porsche race cars, and entered the Porsche Carrera Cup through his self made team, Manthey Racing. With 4 years of winning the Porsche Carrera Cup, not counting 24 hours of Le Mans or 24 hours of Nürburgring, Manthey Racing gained much credibility in the Motorsport world.

GT2RS Interior
Fast forward 23 years, and he and his team got their hands on the Porsche GT2RS. As if it wasn’t already fast enough around the Nürburgring with a record breaking time of 6:47.25, Manthey Racing now offers the MR package for the Porsche GT2RS. With this $106,814 package, the lap time drops to just 6:40.33. To achieve with blisteringly fast lap time, you get a set of aerodynamic upgrades, stiffer suspension, and a little bit of black magic. There is so much downforce, that you need custom end-plates and brackets on the rear wing to keep the car from literally crushing itself.

GT2RS MR Back
Photo Credit: HERE

At the front, the addition of 4 canards and an enlarged front splitter help “attack” the air far more aggressively than the “standard” GT2RS. If you optioned your GT2RS with the Weissach package and paid the $46,552 premium for the wondrous weight saving magnesium wheels, make sure you have an eBay account because with the MR package, you get even lighter and more aerodynamic magnesium wheels. The wheels come with an optional aero cover which can coke in Satin Black, Brilliant Silver, Platinum Silver, or Gold. To support these wheels, the package comes with adjustable racing springs.

GT2RS MR Side
Photo Credit: HERE

Even though this car is so much faster than the standard 911 GT2RS, the same 700 horsepower 3.8L twin turbo Flat 6 is found in the engine bay. To slow this insanely fast car, Manthey Racing has provided new brakes and a brake line set with a stainless steel woven braid. With all of these upgrades, the Porsche 911 GT2RS MR achieved a 6:40.33 lap time around the Nürburgring. With the Manthey Racing Package, you get the true successor to the 997 GT2RS, a real hypercar killer.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The New Porsche Cayenne Coupé: An SUV Coupé the Porsche Way

Cayenne Coupe Cover.jpg
Photo Credit: HERE

After 11 years of the BMW X6 dominating the “coupé” SUV market, Porsche has finally released their own version of the Cayenne and Cayenne Turbo as “coupé” models. Notice that “coupé” has quotation marks around it, because these super SUVs are nothing near a coupé. However, compared to the BMW X6 and Mercedes GLE, I believe Porsche has really brought a strong contender to this class of SUV. They have given it the classic 911 flyline which lowers the original roofline by 0.78 inches and lowered the license plate holder to make the car seem more like a coupé. The car itself is 0.7 inches wider and 0.8 inches lower. They’ve even given it active aero in addition to the carbon fiber wing on the double bubble roof (option). Porsche calls this active aero “PAA” or “Porsche Active Aerodynamics.” Porsche’s Active Aerodynamic system on the Cayenne Turbo Coupé lifts the wing by 5.3 inches at speeds above 56 mph.

Cayenne Coupe Side
Photo Credit: HERE

The new Porsche Cayenne Coupé comes with 2 trim options, the regular Cayenne and the Cayenne Turbo. The regular Cayenne has a turbocharged V6 making 335 horsepower and and 332 lb.-ft. of torque, while the Cayenne Turbo has a 4.0 liter twin turbocharged V8 making 541 horsepower and 567 lb/ft of torque. Both models have the same eight speed Tiptronic with all wheel drive. The V6 Cayenne reaches 60 mph in 5.7 seconds, pushing to a top speed of 151 mph. Impressively, the Turbo model flies from 0 to 60 mph in 3.7 seconds, and on to a top speed of 178 mph.

Cayenne Coupe
Photo Credit: HERE

If you’d like to have an even faster super SUV, Porsche provides 3 sport packages, which all include a carbon fiber roof, carbon fiber interior trim, and 22 inch Porsche Design wheels. This sport package fitted to the V6 Cayenne drops the 0-60 time by 0.1 seconds. A 2+2 layout is optional on the Cayenne Coupé, the regular Cayenne bench in the back is standard. Rear passengers sit 1.18 inches lower in the Coupé for better headroom. Apart from all of these options, many standard features are new for this Porsche. 20 inch wheels, a panoramic glass roof, 8 way adjustable seats, the Porsche Chrono Package, parking assist, and “PASM” or “Porsche Active Suspension Management.”

Cayenne Coupe Interior
Photo Credit: HERE

Onto pricing, the Cayenne Coupé starts at $76,550 and the Turbo starts at $131,350. The regular Coupé is $9,600 extra over a normal Cayenne, and the Turbo is $5,500 extra. If you count in all the equipment that comes standard on the new Coupé, the premium matches what you’re getting. Options can kill however, because I’ve already been able to option this car up to a whopping $197,985.

Cayenne Coupe Back
Photo Credit: HERE

Now, since this is a coupe SUV, the buyer demographic doesn’t really care about storage, but let’s compare anyways. In the regular Cayenne Coupé, cargo space is 22 cubic feet, more than doubling to 54.3 cubic feet with the rear seats down. In the normal Cayenne cargo space is 5.1 cubic feet extra and 6.0 cubic feet extra with the seats folded down. The Turbo model has slightly less space, with a capacity of 21.2 cubic feet and 53.3 cubic feet with the seats folded. I don’t know why it doesn’t have just as much space, I mean, the extra turbos are in the front right?

Cayenne Coupe Competitors
Photo Credit: HERE

Speaking as a Cayenne S owner, I should be yelling, “No! This is not what Porsche is! They should not be following the market trend!” Instead, I find the new Coupé to be quite a refreshing addition to the lineup. Compared to its siblings, the Audi Q8 and the Lamborghini Urus, I feel like it is much more elegant. Compared to the giants of the market, the Mercedes GLE and the trend setter BMW X6, I feel like they will get a run for their money with their new Porsche rival.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Electrification: The Porsche Mission E

What are YOUR thoughts on the upcoming Porsche Taycan?

Mission E Cover
Photo Credit: HERE

With the reveal of the Porsche Taycan approaching fast, with the sweep of electrification across the car industry, let’s go back and see how this idea all began with Porsche: The Mission E Concept. In 2015, the Porsche Mission E Concept was revealed at the Geneva International Motor Show. This new concept was a huge jump from Porsche’s current lineup, it was 100% electric. At the time, Porsche had the Panamera S E-Hybrid, Cayenne S E-Hybrid, and the closest thing they had to an electric sports car was the 918 Spyder, but the reveal of the Mission E concept was the first time Porsche had ever mentioned 100% electrification.  Michael Mauer’s stunning design work and its all electric drivetrain made the Mission E Concept one of the most talked about cars at the 2015 Geneva International Motor Show.

Mission E Back
Photo Credit: HERE

Because the Mission E Concept was just a concept, many of the specifications weren’t 100% accurate. As a matter of fact, they  might not even be relevant to the upcoming Taycan. For all we know, we could be getting just another electric sedan or maybe an even more powerful and stunning car like what happened with the Porsche Carrera GT concept. But despite the unknown, Porsche has given us some numbers. The Mission E runs 2 electric motors that produce over 590 horsepower and it features all wheel drive. This all sums up to a 0-100 kph (62 mph) in under 3.5 seconds. 200 kph (124 mph) is achieved in less than 12 seconds, onto a top speed of 155 mph.

Porsche’s goal is for the Mission E to be able to hit a range of 500 kilometers (311 miles) on a single charge having 800 Volts ready at a tap of the throttle. To charge the newly developed 90 Kilowatt hour battery, Porsche has devised a system called “Porsche Turbo Charging, which charges the battery to 80% in just 15 minutes. For comparison, a Tesla supercharger charges an 85 Kilowatt hour Tesla Model S to 100% in an hour and 15 minutes.

Mission E Sport Turismo
Photo Credit: HERE

3 years after the reveal of the Porsche Mission E concept, Porsche revealed the Mission E Cross Turismo Concept at the 2018 Geneva International Motor Show to stir up some discussion before the true reveal of the Taycan. Essentially, the Mission E Cross Turismo is a cross breed between the Mission E sedan and the Panamera Sport Turismo wagon. Michael Mauer, the designer of both the Mission E and the Cross Turismo, said that these concepts foreshadow a future Porsche lineup.

Mission E Sport Truismo Back
Photo Credit: HERE

Speaking of Porsche’s plans for electrification, what are the plans for an electric 911? With electrification spreading to cars like the bubonic plague, why wouldn’t Porsche expand the 911 range by adding an electric option? The 911 has always been a 911 with its rear mounted Flat 6 and if Porsche were to incorporate batteries, I highly doubt it would be behind the rear axles for handling purposes. An electric 911 wouldn’t be a true 911, however, in order to keep up with the times, it is likely that by 2027 almost all of Porsche’s lineup will be fully electric. Porsche’s CEO, Oliver Blume has strongly stuck by his statement that the 911 will be the last Porsche to be completely converted to electrification, if it will even be necessary. A hybrid 911 however, is nearly here, rolling in with the facelifted 992 generation in 2023.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!