Porsche’s New Accessory Raises A Question About Classic Cars

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A classic Porsche, is truly something special. Many in fact, argue that the Porsches of new are nothing compared to their air-cooled brethren. They would rather have a 944 Turbo over a new Cayman or a 993 Carrera RS over a 991.2 GT3RS. I honestly can’t blame them, the old cars just have something special about them and arguably feel better to drive. But there is one thing the newer cars have that the old cars simply cannot match: good infotainment. Things like bluetooth radio and Apple Car Play unfortunately did not exist up until a few years ago, and that can be a big pain for anyone with an older car-Porsches included. I for example find it easier to play Spotify through my phone than to try and connect it to my 986 Boxster’s radio. But Porsche now has a solution: PCCM.

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Originally introduced in 2015, PCCM, or “Porsche Classic Communication Management,” is a high quality, modern infotainment setup meant to replace those in older models. In my opinion, it looks fantastic. It’s very clean, subtle, and doesn’t really disturb the vintage character of the car. As of this year, PCCM is being upgraded with Apple Car Play, which is a plus to many. More importantly though, Porsche has decided to expand their PCCM upgrade to newer cars like the 986 Boxster and the 996 911.

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PCCM Plus (the one for the 986 and 996) features a 7 inch touchscreen with all the modern amenities including Android Auto which isn’t included in new Porsches surprisingly. The system is pricy though, costing $1,555 for PCCM and $1,735 for PCCM Plus, so I’d probably save it for a 996 Carrera or GT3 instead of buying it for my $8,000 986.

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Now all this tech is cool, don’t get my wrong, but should we really be fitting modern features into classic cars? To be completely honest, I totally understand the side of those who wouldn’t but if I had a classic Porsche, I would definitely get this. PCCM isn’t some tacky aftermarket radio, it’s a carefully designed, genuine Porsche product. With PCCM you can carve up a canyon road in your 993 Turbo listening to your favorite Spotify playlist without a care in the world. I say it’s a great buy for anyone who owns a piece of Porsche history.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The Porsche 918’s Successor Will NOT Be Fully Electric

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Believe it or not, the Porsche 918 ended production 5 years ago, I know right. And up until a few months ago, we had only gotten hints that a successor would  be coming in the following years; not much else. That was until Porsche unveiled their stunning 917 Concept Study model, hinting at what the future had to offer. Then again, that really didn’t mean much considering it was nothing more than a drawing brought to life meant to be a tribute to the legendary 917 racecar. That changed today.

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Thanks to the Dutch news site, Autovisie, we now have leaked patent images from Porsche of what very well may be, the next 918. As you can see, the design is HEAVILY based off of the 917 Concept Study we saw just a few months ago. And judging by all the detail, angles, and features, this looks very much like a production car to be. Oh, and it’s pretty beautiful too.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Now, I know what you’re thinking. “So what, it’s just a basic drawing,” and I guess you would be right. However, if you look at the back, you can clearly see two exhaust pipes sticking out of the car. This tells us two very important details about the car. One, the new car will have some sort of combustion engine which is huge since previously, we thought it would be electric. And two, this car is likely coming much sooner than we thought. Let me elaborate on that.

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Photo Credit: HERE

When asked about whether or not they’d be making an electric hypercar, Porsche stated time and time again that they were waiting for battery technology to improve before they went through with such a project (they wanted batteries to be lighter). So assuming Porsche is staying true to their word, it’s very likely that Porsche decided that they didn’t want to wait for lighter batteries, they wanted to make the car now.

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Photo Credit: HERE

It would make sense too, considering that in a year or two, we’re going to have cars like the Aston Martin Valkyrie, the AMG One, and the McLaren Speedtail. Not to mention all the new electric hypercars that’ll hit the market. I guess Porsche wants a piece of the pie now, and I’m so glad they’re using a combustion engine. This is gonna be good…I can feel it.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The Man, The Myth, The Legend: Hans Mezger

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If you’ve ever been on a Porsche forum, or to a Porsche meet, or anything regarding Porsches, you’ve probably heard the name, Mezger. People love to go on and on about how their cars have the “legendary Mezger engine.” I’ve seen so many vanity plates for 997 GT3s and Turbos just by driving around LA. The name has been thrown around so much that I think few people even know where it comes from. Let’s talk about Hans Mezger.

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Mezger began working for Porsche in 1957 and his work ended up making Porsche what it is today. Don’t believe me? He was designed the 911’s (then called 901) original 2.0 liter flat 6 engine! Yeah, that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Mezger’s greatest contribution came in the form of the Porsche 917. The flat 12 that brought Porsche its first victory in the 24 Hours of Le Mans was designed by none other than Mezger.

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His two part aluminum crank case design became the base of all the 911s with “Mezger” engines; that’s where the name comes from. The Mezger engine represents arguably the best of the best for the 911 in terms of performance and reliability. The original design for this particular engine originated from the 911 GT1, and it was then carried over to all the 996 and 997 GT and Turbo cars.

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In it’s ultimate spec, Mezger’s 911 engine took the form of that found in the 911 GT3RS 4.0. Making 500 hp without forced induction is a strong feat even today, let alone back in 2012. The 3.8 liter version of this street engine ended up winning 13th overall in the 24 Hours of Le Mans (in street legal 997.2 GT3RS’ might I add). So long story short, Mezger’s a pretty cool guy with some incredible achievement under his belt. Thankfully it was Porsche that took him in and not Ferrari.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

 

The Coronavirus Finally Takes Its Toll On Porsche

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As many of us have been recently informed of, the COVID-19 virus has taken over nearly every aspect of our lives. It has halted our economy, our jobs, our commutes, and our social lives. It has also halted what we hold very dearly to our hearts: the beautiful automobile. Production has ceased worldwide due to this COVID-19 outbreak, and Porsche is no exception to this. Due to a foreseeable decrease in demand, the entire Volkswagen Group, including Porsche has halted production for 2 weeks, as of now. 

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What does this mean? It doesn’t necessarily mean anything terrible, it’s just a way for Porsche to deflect any sort of loss in the company, so they don’t have to pay any of the workers on the production line. Porsche has also halted any business trips to decrease the amount of contact between their employees. By employing these extreme measures, Porsche has secured financial stability through this challenging and unique time in the world. 

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“With these measures, our company contributes to the protection of the workforce and the reduction of the spread of the coronavirus. The actual consequences are not yet predictable. It is therefore too early for forecasts. What is clear is that 2020 will be a very challenging year,” says Oliver Blume, Chairman of the Executive Board of Porsche AG. “We can only overcome the pandemic together and by taking rigorous measures.” 

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Because of the virus and our weakening economy, a decrease in demand was inevitable. They can’t just make a new Boxster and Cayenne and call it a day because those cars saved them when they were nearing bankruptcy. A decrease in demand means every single car. 

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Photo Credit: HERE

There’s a two way street to this situation. No production might save Porsche’s financial situation, but the RS Report situation won’t fare that well. There will be a decrease in what we can write about in our articles so we want to hear about what you want to read! Please leave suggestions in the comments, no request will go unnoticed. More car reviews? Some history about rare and forgotten Porsches? Maybe some production numbers and special editions? Let us know!

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The Porsche 918’s Successor May Be Coming Sooner Than We Thought

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Photo Credit: HERE

The 911 is what makes Porsche Porsche. For over 50 years, this iconic, rear engined sports car has been redefining the performance car industry unlike anything else. But every 10 years or so, Porsche decides to go all out. Forget the 911 here, I’m talking about Porsche’s mid engined supercars. It started with the 959 (which is rear engined, but still), then the 911 GT1, followed by the Carrera GT, and finally the 918 Spyder. All of these cars were among the fastest cars of their day, introducing revolutionary design, engineering, and performance which other cars wouldn’t be able to match for generations. Every 10 years or so, Porsche makes one of these “halo cars” and it’s without a doubt that the next one will be electric.

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Now, after the reveal of the 918, Porsche made it very clear that they were in no rush to make a successor since battery technology was not advanced enough to create a proper, lightweight supercar. This still applies today. Although batteries have gotten better, today’s electric hypercars are still very heavy compared to their gas powered competitors. Granted they make around 2000 hp (I’m talking to you Lotus Evija) but that’s not what Porsche is looking to build. Based off of this, I think it’s safe to assume that Porsche’s next halo car is more than a few years away. But think again.

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All electric cars from the Nissan Leaf to the Rimac Concept One are powered by lithium ion batteries, the best of which are pretty heavy and only have about 300 miles worth of range in them. Samsung however, recently made a discovery. Using a type of battery called a solid state battery, they were able to create a longer lasting, more energy dense battery that could potentially power an EV for 500 miles. Not to mention, it would have a lifecycle 1000 charges-that’s 500,000 miles on one battery pack! Cool stuff, I know, but how does this apply to Porsches?

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Well, if automakers choose to adopt and further develop this technology, Porsche could finally have the lightweight batteries they have been looking for to put in the 918 successor. Now obviously this is all speculation and we have some years left before this tech gets approved for use in EVs, but it’s a good sign that things are improving. Progress is being made people and I honestly wouldn’t be surprised if we get our next halo car a few years early.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

 

The Most Important Porsches of the 2010s

With the start of 2020 comes not only a new year, but an entirely new decade. The roaring 20s are back and the cars of the 2020s are just getting started. But as we step into this new era, it’s important to take a look at the past just to see how far we’ve come. Here are the most important Porsches of the 2010s.

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997.2 911 Turbo

Introduced back in 2009, the 997.2 generation 911 is arguably the brand’s best. With gorgeous, modern styling and old fashioned Porsche driving dynamics, it’s really hard to hate the 997.2. What’s important about this generation’s 911 Turbo in particular, is that this was the last 911 Turbo to feature a 6 speed manual. That’s right, back in 2010, you could pick up a 911 Turbo with a 3.8 liter twin turbo flat 6, 500 hp, and 6 speed manual. What a day that would be, huh?

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997.2 911 GT2RS

Today, the 911 GT2RS is more like a GT3RS with a 911 Turbo engine. It’s refined, fast as can be, and relatively easy to drive. Well, back in the day, the GT2RS was basically a 911 Turbo with the dial cranked up to 11; simple, yet so amazing. With a 3.6 liter twin turbo flat 6, 620 hp, rear wheel drive, and a curb weight of 3,020 pounds, the 997.2 GT2RS demolished the competition of its day, not to mention it has no trouble leaving modern supercars in the dust. The 997.2 GT2RS was also the last GT2 to come with 3 pedals, long live the manual.

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997.2 GT3RS 4.0

Dig around in any Porsche forum, and you’re bound to hear the name, “Mezger.” Well, Hans Mezger has designed most, if not all of Porsche’s greatest engines. His work with the 911 was most notably the engines in the 996 and 997 GT and Turbo cars. This man is a true genius and his last masterpiece when it came to 911s was the M97/74 engine, also known as the 4.0 in the 997.2 GT3RS 4.0. Making 500 hp, and weighing less the 3,000 lbs, the 911 GT3RS 4.0 was a real treat, a legend among legends basically. In my opinion, the GT3RS 4.0 is the greatest 911 ever made, not to mention it was the last Porsche with an RS badge to have a manual transmission.

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Macan

Taking a break from sports cars, I think it’s very important that we recognize the Porsche Macan. Since it was introduced around 2015, the Macan has consistently been Porsche’s best selling model. This is important because a lot of the money used to fund research for Porsche’s sports cars likely came from Macan sales. So, as long as Porsche has the Macan, it will have a consistent stream of income, which is nothing to complain about. I think we owe a thank you to this little crossover.

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918 Spyder

The Porsche 918 Spyder needs no introduction. When it first debuted, it was one of the fastest, and most technologically advanced hypercars ever made. The 918 was a leading pioneer in hybrid technology among performance cars, not to mention it was the first ever production car to lap the Nurburgring in under 7 minutes. With a 4.6 liter naturally aspirated V8 and two electric motors, the 918 made 887 hp, 944 lb/ft of torque and could launch to 60 mph in as little as 2.2 seconds! Even with today’s advances in technology and design, the Porsche 918 still remains a force to be reckoned with.

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981 Cayman GT4

Matt Farah (@thesmokingtire) has a distinct term for what Porsche has been doing to the Cayman and Boxster. The theory is, that no matter how good the Cayman and Boxster get, Porsche always makes sure that the 911 is better. And up until the GT4, we had every reason to believe this theory which was called the “Cayman Complex.” But when the Cayman GT4 first came out, it left the world speechless. The 981 GT4 was the first time that Porsche’s GT Division had gotten their hands on a Cayman, and it was arguably one of the best sports cars ever made. It was light, small, fun to drive, and not too expensive either. It also came stock with GT3 suspension and a 911 motor which made the GT4 VERY fast. it drove all the 911 enthusiasts nuts!

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991.1 911 R

I mentioned earlier that the 911 GT3RS 4.0 was the last Porsche RS car to have a manual transmission. This was due to the fact that Porsche thought its customers did not want manuals, and that they only wanted the fastest car possible. The 911 R proved them wrong. With today’s Porsche’s there is a trend which involves bringing back the manual transmission. Well, it all started back with the 911R. The 911R was essentially a GT3RS, without all the aero and the PDK. It was what Porsche had always intended the 911 to be, a bare bones, driver focused sports car. It was brilliant, and its resale value proved it.

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991.2 911 Carrera Models

As much as I love the 911, I can’t lie to myself and say that the car radically changes every generation. The concept of evolution rather than revolution is what’s defined the 911 over the years, but I think the most important change with the 911 of this decade came with the 991.2 Carrera models. This change came in the form of a 3.0 liter twin turbo flat 6. It was with the 991.2 generation that all 911 models except the GT3 and GT3Rs became turbocharged, and it was controversial to say the least. Numbers wise, this new engine was better in every way, but it just lacked the sound and emotion of its naturally aspirated predecessor. So for the future, I’m just glad the 911 has a flat 6, but if I were to choose one, I’d go for an NA motor.

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718 Spyder

With the 981 generation of Caymans and Boxsters, it was only the Cayman GT4 that got the true “GT treatment.” The 981 Boxster Spyder was kind of left out in that regard. This was not the case with the 718 Spyder. The new 718 Spyder is the first ever Boxster created by Porsche’s GT division and is miles better than its predecessor. With its naturally aspirated 4.0 liter flat 6 and its 8,000 rpm redline, there really isn’t much to complain about. It’s a phenomenal car, and a true GT Porsche.

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Porsche Taycan

Out of this entire list, I feel that the Porsche Taycan is the most important. Like it or not, electric cars are the future, and Porsche’s first ever electric car is a HUGE deal. Despite its inefficiencies and astronomical price tag, the Taycan is an amazing car. It brings top tier luxury, and Porsche performance to a segment that desperately needed it. The Taycan is Porsche’s first step into the future, and there is lots more to come.

Which Porsches do you think were the most important of this decade? Were there any that I missed? Feel free to leave a comment and let me know. Happy New Year!

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The Porsche 912: The Original “Poor Man’s Porsche”

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In 1965, the Porsche 912 was introduced to the world as an entry level 911. Because the 911 was still a fairly new product replacing the Type 356, Porsche needed a cheaper version of their 911 in order for it to appeal to the general public. Through this strategy, the 912 was a hit and initially outsold the 911. 

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The 912 looked the same as a 911, but it had a horizontally mounted 4 cylinder engine which was a tweaked version of the 1.6 liter Type 616 engine used in the 356. This new engine had 5 less horsepower than the 356 but still delivered the same number of torque. It produced 102 horsepower at 5,800 rpm and 91 lb/ft of torque at 3,500 rpm instead of 4,200 rpm in the old 356. The new body style paired with the tweaked engine resulted in better weight distribution, better handling, and better range than it’s Flat 6 counterpart, the 911.

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In order to keep the price down, the 912 had less standard features than the 911 along with 2 missing cylinders. However, because of the same styling and similar performance, the 912 seemed like a good purchase to make, to new and previous Porsche clients. Porsche outsold their own 911 with the 912, making about 30,000 coupes and 2,500 Targas throughout its 5 year run. 

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The 912 was discontinued due to the 911 gaining popularity, but was reintroduced to the US market only as the 912E six years later. They only built about 2,000 912Es (10,000 911s to compare) but the 912E was a solid $3,000 less than the $10,000 911S. The 912E used a Porsche revised version of the VW Type 4 engine which boasted a 2 Liter Flat 4 instead of the VW’s 1.7 Liters. The new 912E was a perfect grand tourer, with its 30mpg, 20 gallon fuel tank, and a 600 mile range. The 912E has the same chassis as the 911 but because of the less weight over the rear axles, it was much less prone to oversteer.

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Ultimately, the 912 is the less known, “poor man’s” 911. If Porsche was to introduce a new 912 that looked like a 911 but was cheaper with a tuned Cayman 4 cylinder, would you be interested in buying one? Let us know in the comments!

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!