Espo Porsche: Showing Why Air Cooled 911s Are So Great

AC 1
Photo Credit: @espo.porsche

This week, we had the honor of visiting a Porsche enthusiast’s dream: Espo Porsche. Espo Porsche is basically your one stop shop for Porsches, they will literally work on anything from a 356 to a Cayenne. The shop was started by John Esposito in 2010, with the aim of combining proper craftsmanship with Porsche’s loyal fanbase.
John is a true artist, when it comes to cars. Since junior high, John had taken his schools’ autoshop classes, developing his hands on skills along with his passion for cars. It’s no surprise that right after high school, he went to work at a body shop. It was these body shops that inspired John’s love for Porsches, he was always surrounded by them. Although HE loved the cars, it didn’t seem that the places he worked for shared his passion and attention to detail. “They hacked the Porsches there, hacked them terribly. Uneven panel gaps all around,” he said. It was this poor quality work that motivated him to open up his own shop, to do things the right way. John ended up building is his first 911 in 2014 (a 911SCRS recreation) and opened Espo Porsche‘s current shop in 2010. He has been working on Porsches for over 47 years.

AC 2
Photo Credit: @espo.porsche

If there was one thing we took away from our interview, it was that there’s nothing like an old 911, nothing at all. He went on and on about how new Porsches are too “sterile” (aka luxurious) and not focused solely on driving pleasure. I could imagine the scene right then and there. Imagine carving up the canyons in a 1973 (he said 1969-1973 911s are the best) 911S. You didn’t have many features, but you also didn’t have any distractions. Just you and the open road with nothing but time, this was what we as the car community had been looking for with modern cars. I realized that with all this technology, cars aren’t as fun to drive anymore. We don’t hear the true engine, rather an exhaust muffled by turbos. We don’t feel the roads with the steering, we can’t even shift our own gears for God’s sake. I now understood why air cooled Porsches have shot up so high in value, people miss this feeling.

This was emphasized even more when we were shown how easy it was to work on these old cars. With 4 bolts, you could drop the engine and fix whatever you wanted, the steel chassis were easy to reinforce and repair if needed be. Porsche knew people would be driving their 911s, and they built them like so. The engines were made of steel rather than plastic, there were no complicated electronics that would break. Everything was mechanical, everything was simpler. Today’s aluminum 911 bodies are lighter, that’s a fact, but they’re not as easy to repair, the same goes for the plastic engine components.

AC 3
Photo Credit: HERE

Today’s cars are truly excellent, and mind mindbogglingly fast, but they’re missing something, something that the charts can say. They’re missing that special aura about them, “No one’s gonna restore a 996.” Thanks to Espo Porsche, I learned that in order to save the sports car, we need not to look towards the future (electric motors and more tech) but to the past; that’s when sports cars were truly about the art of driving.

Before I end this article, I would like to thank everyone at Espo Porsche for inviting us over and truly reviving our passion for air cooled 911s. A special thanks to John for the interview and to @womeninporsche for giving us a tour of the amazing facility!

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The New Porsche Cayenne Coupé: An SUV Coupé the Porsche Way

Cayenne Coupe Cover.jpg
Photo Credit: HERE

After 11 years of the BMW X6 dominating the “coupé” SUV market, Porsche has finally released their own version of the Cayenne and Cayenne Turbo as “coupé” models. Notice that “coupé” has quotation marks around it, because these super SUVs are nothing near a coupé. However, compared to the BMW X6 and Mercedes GLE, I believe Porsche has really brought a strong contender to this class of SUV. They have given it the classic 911 flyline which lowers the original roofline by 0.78 inches and lowered the license plate holder to make the car seem more like a coupé. The car itself is 0.7 inches wider and 0.8 inches lower. They’ve even given it active aero in addition to the carbon fiber wing on the double bubble roof (option). Porsche calls this active aero “PAA” or “Porsche Active Aerodynamics.” Porsche’s Active Aerodynamic system on the Cayenne Turbo Coupé lifts the wing by 5.3 inches at speeds above 56 mph.

Cayenne Coupe Side
Photo Credit: HERE

The new Porsche Cayenne Coupé comes with 2 trim options, the regular Cayenne and the Cayenne Turbo. The regular Cayenne has a turbocharged V6 making 335 horsepower and and 332 lb.-ft. of torque, while the Cayenne Turbo has a 4.0 liter twin turbocharged V8 making 541 horsepower and 567 lb/ft of torque. Both models have the same eight speed Tiptronic with all wheel drive. The V6 Cayenne reaches 60 mph in 5.7 seconds, pushing to a top speed of 151 mph. Impressively, the Turbo model flies from 0 to 60 mph in 3.7 seconds, and on to a top speed of 178 mph.

Cayenne Coupe
Photo Credit: HERE

If you’d like to have an even faster super SUV, Porsche provides 3 sport packages, which all include a carbon fiber roof, carbon fiber interior trim, and 22 inch Porsche Design wheels. This sport package fitted to the V6 Cayenne drops the 0-60 time by 0.1 seconds. A 2+2 layout is optional on the Cayenne Coupé, the regular Cayenne bench in the back is standard. Rear passengers sit 1.18 inches lower in the Coupé for better headroom. Apart from all of these options, many standard features are new for this Porsche. 20 inch wheels, a panoramic glass roof, 8 way adjustable seats, the Porsche Chrono Package, parking assist, and “PASM” or “Porsche Active Suspension Management.”

Cayenne Coupe Interior
Photo Credit: HERE

Onto pricing, the Cayenne Coupé starts at $76,550 and the Turbo starts at $131,350. The regular Coupé is $9,600 extra over a normal Cayenne, and the Turbo is $5,500 extra. If you count in all the equipment that comes standard on the new Coupé, the premium matches what you’re getting. Options can kill however, because I’ve already been able to option this car up to a whopping $197,985.

Cayenne Coupe Back
Photo Credit: HERE

Now, since this is a coupe SUV, the buyer demographic doesn’t really care about storage, but let’s compare anyways. In the regular Cayenne Coupé, cargo space is 22 cubic feet, more than doubling to 54.3 cubic feet with the rear seats down. In the normal Cayenne cargo space is 5.1 cubic feet extra and 6.0 cubic feet extra with the seats folded down. The Turbo model has slightly less space, with a capacity of 21.2 cubic feet and 53.3 cubic feet with the seats folded. I don’t know why it doesn’t have just as much space, I mean, the extra turbos are in the front right?

Cayenne Coupe Competitors
Photo Credit: HERE

Speaking as a Cayenne S owner, I should be yelling, “No! This is not what Porsche is! They should not be following the market trend!” Instead, I find the new Coupé to be quite a refreshing addition to the lineup. Compared to its siblings, the Audi Q8 and the Lamborghini Urus, I feel like it is much more elegant. Compared to the giants of the market, the Mercedes GLE and the trend setter BMW X6, I feel like they will get a run for their money with their new Porsche rival.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The Porsche 917 Concept Study: The Perfect Road Car?

917 Concept Study Cover
Photo Credit: HERE

Let’s be honest, the car world is not perfect. Every car has its flaws. Some are too big, some are too small, some have a small engine, others have too big of an engine; the list goes on and on. Because of this, our minds are constantly plagued with “what ifs.” What if the Ferrari 488 didn’t have turbos, what if the Porsche GT3 had more power, what if McLarens had souls? I don’t know about you, but I could literally spend all day thinking about “what if” scenarios for cars. Out of all of these, one has truly stuck out to me,”What if Porsche built a 917 road car?”

917 30 RS Report
Photo Credit: HERE

The Porsche 917 was as Porsche called it, “The most famous racing car of all time,” having won them their first victory at the 24 Hours of Le Mans and countless other victories for many decades, in many different divisions. One day when I was little, I was looking through my dad’s old Porsche magazines and on one of the pages, there was a spec list for all the 917s ever made. As a kid, and even now, I was always obsessed with the numbers. I knew every horsepower figure, engine size and 0-60 of any car that you could mention, so you could imagine my excitement when I read that a Porsche had 1200 horsepower, a flat 12, and 1200 hp. Even as a 7 year old, my first thought was, “Why don’t they use this engine in a road car?”

Porsche-917-street-legal-3
Photo Credit: HERE

Eventually, I found out that this magical car that I had read about was none other than the legendary Porsche 917, specifically the 917/30, the crazy turbocharged one. A few years later, I got my first phone and with that came the magic that was YouTube. I was now watching Top Gear on the daily and falling in love with cars even more. One day, I don’t know why, the memory of the Porsche 917 popped into my head and with that, the same question of why it wasn’t a road car. With that, another question came into my head,”What did this flat 12 even sound like?” Within 5 minutes, I was blown away by videos of the 917K screaming down the straightaways followed by the nuclear blasts that they called downshifts. (Link to that video HERE). This made me wonder even more why Porsche hadn’t put this godly engine in a road car.

917K Back
Photo Credit: HERE

Fast forward to a few days ago, when Porsche unveiled the 917 Concept Study at the Geneva Motor Show. The 917 Concept Study is a stunning interpretation of what a modern day Porsche 917 would look like, a celebration of the Porsche 917’s 50th anniversary. Long story short, it’s the closest thing we’ll get to a 917 road car. Imagine the scene now: you’re cruising down the Pacific Coast Highway in a road legal 917, rowing your own gears, listening to the howl of 12 angry cylinders right behind your head. You approach a tunnel, your nerves tense, the hair on the back of your neck stands up as you downshift, heeling and toeing ever so perfectly as you hear the engine crackle, then, everything goes silent, you have entered the tunnel. But out of nowhere, you unleash all 12 angry beasts behind you, their howls echoing off the tunnel walls as you blast into hyperspace. Name me a more perfect moment, name me a more perfect car.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

 

Electrification: The Porsche Mission E

What are YOUR thoughts on the upcoming Porsche Taycan?

Mission E Cover
Photo Credit: HERE

With the reveal of the Porsche Taycan approaching fast, with the sweep of electrification across the car industry, let’s go back and see how this idea all began with Porsche: The Mission E Concept. In 2015, the Porsche Mission E Concept was revealed at the Geneva International Motor Show. This new concept was a huge jump from Porsche’s current lineup, it was 100% electric. At the time, Porsche had the Panamera S E-Hybrid, Cayenne S E-Hybrid, and the closest thing they had to an electric sports car was the 918 Spyder, but the reveal of the Mission E concept was the first time Porsche had ever mentioned 100% electrification.  Michael Mauer’s stunning design work and its all electric drivetrain made the Mission E Concept one of the most talked about cars at the 2015 Geneva International Motor Show.

Mission E Back
Photo Credit: HERE

Because the Mission E Concept was just a concept, many of the specifications weren’t 100% accurate. As a matter of fact, they  might not even be relevant to the upcoming Taycan. For all we know, we could be getting just another electric sedan or maybe an even more powerful and stunning car like what happened with the Porsche Carrera GT concept. But despite the unknown, Porsche has given us some numbers. The Mission E runs 2 electric motors that produce over 590 horsepower and it features all wheel drive. This all sums up to a 0-100 kph (62 mph) in under 3.5 seconds. 200 kph (124 mph) is achieved in less than 12 seconds, onto a top speed of 155 mph.

Porsche’s goal is for the Mission E to be able to hit a range of 500 kilometers (311 miles) on a single charge having 800 Volts ready at a tap of the throttle. To charge the newly developed 90 Kilowatt hour battery, Porsche has devised a system called “Porsche Turbo Charging, which charges the battery to 80% in just 15 minutes. For comparison, a Tesla supercharger charges an 85 Kilowatt hour Tesla Model S to 100% in an hour and 15 minutes.

Mission E Sport Turismo
Photo Credit: HERE

3 years after the reveal of the Porsche Mission E concept, Porsche revealed the Mission E Cross Turismo Concept at the 2018 Geneva International Motor Show to stir up some discussion before the true reveal of the Taycan. Essentially, the Mission E Cross Turismo is a cross breed between the Mission E sedan and the Panamera Sport Turismo wagon. Michael Mauer, the designer of both the Mission E and the Cross Turismo, said that these concepts foreshadow a future Porsche lineup.

Mission E Sport Truismo Back
Photo Credit: HERE

Speaking of Porsche’s plans for electrification, what are the plans for an electric 911? With electrification spreading to cars like the bubonic plague, why wouldn’t Porsche expand the 911 range by adding an electric option? The 911 has always been a 911 with its rear mounted Flat 6 and if Porsche were to incorporate batteries, I highly doubt it would be behind the rear axles for handling purposes. An electric 911 wouldn’t be a true 911, however, in order to keep up with the times, it is likely that by 2027 almost all of Porsche’s lineup will be fully electric. Porsche’s CEO, Oliver Blume has strongly stuck by his statement that the 911 will be the last Porsche to be completely converted to electrification, if it will even be necessary. A hybrid 911 however, is nearly here, rolling in with the facelifted 992 generation in 2023.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

 

 

The Legend of the Porsche Speedster

Did YOU know the story of the Porsche Speedster?

356 Speedster Cover
Photo Credit: HERE

As many of you know, Porsche will be releasing a production version of the 991.2 speedster next month at the Geneva International Motor Show. But what many of you don’t know, is the history of the speedster, the essence of it. We see the low cut windshield, signature five spoke wheels, and the flying buttresses, immediately realizing that we are not looking at an ordinary 911, rather, a speedster.

991.2 Speedster
Photo Credit: HERE

While Ferdinand Porsche was imprisoned in France, his son, Ferry Porsche kept the family business going to fulfill his dreams of building a sports car under the Porsche name. As a result, the Porsche 356 was born. A car built for handling, acceleration, and braking, many Porsche enthusiasts consider the 356 to be the first true Porsche ever built because it was the first to be fully built under the Porsche name. All other “Porsches” prior were built under the name, Volkswagen.

The 356 speedster however, owes its existence to Max Hoffman, the only importer of Porsche’s to the United States in 1950. Hoffman was achieving great sales success at the time because of Porsche, so he suggested that they should make a car based on the 356 to rival the popular British sports cars dominating the market. He suggested that the new 356 should resemble a Jaguar XK120 and be more affordable than the rest of the 356 line. From this, came the Porsche Type 540, a 356 based sports car. However the Type 540 was far too heavy to be considered a sports car, so Ferry Porsche commissioned popular coach-builder, Heuer-Glaser to build the car out of aluminum. This made the production costs skyrocket. As a result, Porsche had to sell every car for $4,600, at a loss. Even with this price, the Type 540 was still $300 more expensive than the XK120. $300 in today’s money would be $3,193.64, a deal breaker for many people.

Max Hoffman Porsche
Photo Credit: HERE

Porsche discussed this problem with Hoffman and they agreed that a 356 cabriolet would do a better job as a basis, decreasing production costs by being built on the same production line as the other 356s. By removing some trim and weather protection, they decreased the price and reduced the weight of the car. A low cut windshield was made specifically to be removed for race weekends. The most noticeable difference with the Speedster and the normal 356 were the thin chrome strips that ran down the side of the car. To keep the price low, only a speedometer and a temperature gauge were standard. A heater and a tachometer were optional extras in order to keep the base price under $3,000 (typical Porsche options). The car also featured fixed-back bucket seats to add to the race theme. This new Speedster was an instant hit, especially in sunny Southern California. Production peaked at 1,157 cars in 1957, and started declining after until eventually being replaced by the 356 D in 1958.

356 D
Photo Credit: HERE

Make sure to come back when the 991.2 911 Speedster debuts at the Geneva International Motor Show in March, we will be following up on how Porsche continued the Speedster legacy with its 911. As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The Porsche 959: A Showcase of the Future

959 Cover

The Porsche 959 is often regarded as the father of modern supercars. Features we take for granted today like all wheel drive and adjustable suspension started with the 959 as pioneered very advanced technology at the time and formed a glimpse into the next 30 years of the automobile.

959 model

The story of the Porsche’s 959 started back in 1981 when a man named Helmuth Bott approached Porsche’s managing director about his ideas for a new 911. Bott’s vision was to build a sports car that Porsche could rely on for years to come, sporting a whole array of new technologies like all wheel drive. Once he got the green light, Bott eagerly began testing his new prototype, originally called the Gruppe B, in Group B Rally competitions. After years of development, prototypes, and even racecars, the Porsche 959 road car was unveiled in 1985 as the world’s fastest production car with a top speed of 211 mph in the 959 Sport.

Porsche-959-engine

The engine for the 959 was a great leap forward in terms of technology back then. Much like the Porsche Carrera GT, the 959’s engine began life as a race engine, the 2.85 liter twin turbo flat 6 from the Porsche 935.  But there was a slight problem. In the 1980s, the Porsche 911 was still air-cooled, so stuffing a water-cooled engine in a Porsche sports car was sacrilege. So to please purists, Porsche decided to make the cylinders air-cooled, but the rest of the engine water-cooled, a very bold move. And in a time where sports cars were carburetted, the 959 featured a Bosch fuel injection system along with dual overhead camshafts. The turbos were sequential rather than parallel meaning that turbo lag was a thing of the past while power remained high. This all summed up to 450 hp and 369 lb/ft of torque, numbers that can beat sports cars of today. This was upped to 510 hp and 414 lb/ft of torque in the 959 Sport, a number comparable to today’s supercars; and that was just the engine.

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Where the 959 really shined was its all wheel drive system. In the year 1985, the 959 had an all wheel drive system that could monitor and change the torque split between the front and rear wheels. From the cabin, you could adjust the ride height and even the damper stiffness after checking your tire pressure via the electronic tire pressure sensor. Even the body was advanced, constructed from lightweight and exotic materials like aluminum and Kevlar composites along with a material called Nomex for the floors. The 959 even had lightweight magnesium alloy wheels. Keep in mind this was in the year 1985, some cars today don’t even have this technology.

The 959 basically paved the way for the next 30 years of the automobile, showing us what we thought was impossible, and what was beyond our wildest dreams. It’s only fitting that the true successor of the 959 is not the Carrera GT, but the 918 Spyder. With its advanced hybrid powertrain and aerodynamic wizardry, the 918 represents the future of the supercar, much like the 959 did back in its day, and if this is true, then the future is bright my friends, it really is.

959 and 918

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to like and share this article with your friends and follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

 

 

The Untold Story of the Porsche Carrera Name

Do you know where it all started?

356 Carrera

The word Carrera, meaning race in Spanish has been a staple in Porsche naming sequence since the 50s. But does anyone know why? Where did this name originate from? Here is the untold story of the legendary Porsche Carrera name…

_Carrera_Panamericana-1954-11-23

This story of ours takes place in the 1950s, a simpler time when the Porsche 911 was still an idea stirring around in Ferdinand Alexander Porsche’s head, James Dean was taking on the world, and the Cold War was getting under way. Meanwhile, in Mexico, a rather quiet place at the time, there was a race being hosted: The “Carrera Panamericana.” The Carrera Panamericana wasn’t your ordinary race however, as the name suggests, the Carrera Panamericana was a cross-country ordeal. Racing from one end of Mexico to the other, the race consisted of 9 stages, and 5 days of constant racing the best part  on closed public roads. Running for 5 consecutive years (1950-1954) the Carrera Panamericana was widely considered to be the most dangerous race in the world, which is exactly why Porsche got involved.

The first time Porsche got involved with the Carrera Panamericana was in 1952, when two private entrants raced their Porsches in the event. For 1953 however, Porsche racing boss, Huschke von Hanstein aka “The Racing Baron,” was ready to officially take on the event. Von Hanstein commissioned  Porsche 550 Spyders to race in the event but due to ongoing compilations only two private Porsches finished the event. But the Racing Baron returned in 1954, now with heavily modified, and purpose-built 550 Spyders for the event. The battle was a long an tough, but in the end, the two 550s flew past the finish line at a class winning average speed for the 1,908 mile race of 97.63 mph. The two Porsches, piloted by legends Jaroslav Juhan and Hans Herrmann finished 1st and 2nd in their class and 3rd and 4th overall. It was this victory that inspired the Carrera name.

carrera pan

Starting in 1955, Porsche began to name all its race ready models like the 356, 904, 906, 911 and 924 after the Carrera Panamericana. Porsche eventually adopted the name for the base model 911s, making the Carrera name a staple in Porsche’s history.

As always, come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to like and share this article with your friends and follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!