The 997.2 911 GT3RS: Analog Perfection

@lennsport

Before I start, I would first like to thank @lennsport for taking the time out his busy day to make this review possible. He is a true car enthusiast and just a great guy to be around. This wouldn’t have been possible without him.

As time has progressed, so have cars. Cars today are in every way faster and more efficient than they were 10, 20, and 30 years ago. With fancy turbocharged engines, lightning fast dual clutch transmissions, crazy suspension, and carbon ceramic brakes the size of my boxster’s wheels, it’s no surprise at all. But notice how I said “faster” instead of “better.” This is because as we have seen, faster, does not necessarily mean better. I am a firm believer that there is such thing as too much horsepower when it comes to how fun a car is. That is why I firmly believe that the 997.2 GT3RS is the best driver’s car money can buy, period.

Don’t get me wrong, the new GT3RS is a phenomenal car (if you don’t believe me click on this sentence to see our review of one) but it is nothing compared to the 997.2 in terms of driving pleasure.Let me explain.

@lennsport

The Looks and Interior

Looks are subjective, I’ll agree to that. Some people don’t like the look of Porsche’s GT cars with their flared wheel arches and monstrous wings, heck, some people don’t like the look of the Porsche 911 as a whole; I am not one of those people. In my humble opinion, the 997.2 generation is the best looking 911 out there. It has perfect proportions, subtle yet noticable lines, and those perfect tail lights. Combine this subtle, yet special body with the wing and flares of a GT3RS and you get pure perfection, I mean just look at it. It’s not wide like a 4 lane freeway, but it’s not a motorcycle either. If there is a “Goldilocks 911,” this is it. Also it’s the only car in the history of mankind to look good in red wheels which is a plus in my book.

The interior is probably the least special thing about this car and that’s saying something. It’s just as refined and high quality as any 997 with touches of red alcantara and fabric door pulls to make you feel a little special. The seats though are something else. Those buckets are straight out of a racecar and they hold you in like one; they are not for people with back pain.

@lennsport

The Acceleration

Thanks to you guys, I’ve been lucky enough to experience a variety of supercars and sports cars in my life with the 997.2 GT3RS being one of them. And if you’re all about specs and 0-60 times, I’m afraid you’ll be disappointed, this is not the car for you. With 450hp coming out of its 3.8 liter flat 6 and a 3,020 lb curb weight, the 997.2 GT3RS is no slouch, but it’s not at the level of today’s supercars, and quite frankly, I don’t really care. After driving a Ferrari 458, I learned what it means to have too much power. The GT3RS is riding this fine line where it’s blisteringly fast, but not too fast to be unusable. Also, one thing that I noticed was just how linear the power delivery was. They weren’t lying when they said they’d put a racing engine in the GT3RS, that Mezger motor is true to a racecar, much more so than the engine of a 991 GT3RS.

@lennsport

The Sound

Speaking of that glorious Mezger flat 6, one thing that makes the GT3RS so enjoyable is its sound. In a world of muffled, turbocharged, souless, engines, the song of the 997.2 GT3RS is a true gem. The sound is just so raw and unfiltered, it makes the new GT3RS sound like a Tesla. As you climb through the revs (and oh does this engine like to rev), the hairs on the back of your neck stand up as you hear the cams, valves, and exhaust all working in perfect unison up to its 8400 rpm redline. Even at startup and idle, it sounds special with its vibrating flywheel making it sound like a cammed V8 at idle. Long story short, the 997.2 GT3RS is loud and proud, with no compromises what so ever.

@lennsport

The Way It Drives

Everything I’ve mentioned so far: racecar looks, the racecar seats, the racecar engine, and the racecar sound lead up to the 997.2 GT3RS being one of the best, if not the best driving cars ever made. This is largely in part because everything is connected together by a perfect, 997 era 6 speed manual transmission complete with a factory short shifter and tightened gear ratios. The manual is what really brings this car together, and it’s what sets it apart from the competition. Combine this beautiful setup with perfect hydraulic steering feel and some racecar suspension as a nice little cherry on top and you get the 997.2 GT3RS. You know it’s special just by looking at it and after one mash of the throttle pedal, you know you’re in for a treat. The car just grips and grips and grips, just like the new GT3RS’ of today. That suspension gives you a tough time on the street but when you’re going fast, that equates for ZERO body roll. This thing truly corners like it’s on rails. I said before that this car’s acceleration makes it feel outdated, but that is NOT the case with the handling, if anything, it feels much faster than any new supercar.

The Verdict

Going in to this review, I thought the 997.2 GT3RS would feel like a more powerful and slightly sharper version of my 997.1 Carrera. I didn’t think for a second it would be on par with the new supercars of today. Thankfully, I was wrong, this is in every way, a tried and true supercar (scratch that, racecar, this is a racecar). And after reviewing it, I know why they’ve become so expensive. There simply is nothing like it on the road today, and there probably never will be ever again. The 997.2 GT3RS was the last supercar of the Golden Age.

Do you have a cool car for us to review? If so, please feel free to contact us via Instagram @rsreportblog. Thank you!

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

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UPDATE: The Manual 992 is Finally Here!

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@rsreportblog

For those of you that read last week’s article, first of all, thank you so much. Second of all, I’ll admit that we ended on a rather sad note because it seemed like Porsche had given up on a manual transmission for the 992 Carrera models. There had been no news and no test cars and it was becoming time to assume the worst. Thankfully though, I was wrong because about two days after last week’s article was published, Porsche proudly unveiled the manual transmission as a no cost option for the 992 Carrera S and 4S. The manual for the Carrera and Carrera 4 models will be revealed later (likely at this year’s LA Auto Show).

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Photo Credit: HERE

Like from the last 2 generations, the manual transmission in the 992 will be a 7 speed unit-basically a 6 speed with a highway cruising gear. Luckily for the purists, the manual comes as a no cost option and will save you approximately 84 pounds over the standard 8 speed PDK transmission. And for the first time, Porsche will even throw in the Sport Chrono Package free of charge if you select the manual. This option in my opinion is crucial to getting the most fun out of your 911. In the manual 992, it gives you a drive mode select switch, PSM Sport Mode, Automatic Rev matching (you don’t need that), and Porsche Active driveline mounts. More importantly, this would cost an additional $2,720 if it was on a PDK car. Manual equipped cars will also come equipped with mechanical limited slip differentials, unlike the electronic LSD that’s mated to the PDK transmission.

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Photo Credit: HERE

So far, the only performance figures we have for the manual 992s are that they both have the same top speeds as their PDK equipped counterparts (191 mph for the Carrera S and 190 mph for the Carrera 4S). Obviously, 0-60 times will be slower for the manual cars but with some power shifting lessons, I’m sure a skilled driver can keep the times within the mid 3 seconds rather than the low 4s.

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Photo Credit: HERE

So yes, the PDK is faster in every single way possible. It’s also easier to drive, and more fuel efficient. But honestly who cares? A Porsche 911 is a sports car, built for tearing up back roads and racetracks on early Sunday mornings. Your 911 shouldn’t be your daily driver that you lug to work every day, and if it is, I’m sorry to say, but you need a different car. I actually daily drove my 997 911 for about a month and it was awful. The ride was too harsh, the clutch was too heavy, and it drank gas like there was no tomorrow. These cars aren’t built for sitting in traffic jams, if you don’t believe me, drive a 911 below 10 mph, you’ll see what I mean. And there’s no denying that in a car like a Carrera S, whose speed is very accessible and not overwhelming, a manual is by all means, the more fun car to drive. That’s what it’s all about, so thank you Porsche for keeping the manual alive.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Where is the Manual 992?

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Photo Credit: HERE

It’s been almost a year since the 992 generation 911 was unveiled to the world at the LA Auto Show. In that year, the 992 911 has clearly established itself as a car worthy of the 911 badge. Journalist after journalist has raved about the 992’s distinct, 911 style driving feel despite its increased focus on luxury. The 992 is in every way a true 911 so that’s good, but there’s still a lot more to come.

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Photo Credit: HERE

In the year where we’ve had the 992, not much has actually happened in terms of new info. The only models out right now are the Carrera, Carrera 4, Carrera S, and Carrera 4S along with their cabriolet counterparts. Compared to the 30+ variants that were offered for the 991 generation 911, the 992 seems to be falling short, not that it’s a bad thing. But anyway, the 992 clearly has a long way to go and judging by the undisguised 992 Turbos, targas, GT3s, and GTSs, that have been seen testing out on the track, Porsche is clearly up to something. But despite the non-stop onslaught of 992 variants, there seems to be a lack of manual 992s. The only 992s that have been seen recently with a manual have been the GT3 prototypes, but what about the Carrera models already on sale?

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Photo Credit: HERE

For those that don’t know, the 992 was revealed at the 2018 LA Autoshow in the form of the Carrera S and 4S, each solely equipped with Porsche’s new 8 speed PDK transmission. When I was at the event, I noticed the lack of a manual transmission and fearing the worst, I asked about its absence , and was reassured that it would become available next year. Well, we’re about 82% through with 2019 and we’ve yet to see a 992 Carrera with a manual transmission. I don’t know about you but this is pretty alarming.

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Photo Credit: HERE

The manual transmission has always been a staple of a true Porsche. It is what truly connects the driver to the car. The feeling of rowing your own gears through a twisty canyon road is what Porsche has always been about. I understand that the PDK is faster and still fun to drive-trust me, I’ve driven one-but nothing compares to the driving feel of a manual transmission. And it’s not like we’ve never seen a prototype either. Long before the 992 was revealed, an image surfaced of a disguised prototype with, you guessed it, a proper manual gearbox. So has Porsche really given up on the manual for its base model cars? We already lost the NA engine, and I certainly hope we don’t lose the manual transmission. Let’s hope that the upcoming LA Auto Show will clear some things up for us.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

 

Is the Porsche 911 Still a True Sports Car?

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Photo Credit: HERE

The Porsche 911 has long had a reputation of being [in a German accent],”The world’s most favorite sports car.” Over time, that reputation has not changed one bit but the 911 itself has. With each generation, the 911 has gotten heavier, wider, more comfortable, etc. Take the 991 for example. The 991 911 was better in every measurable way than its predecessor,  the 997. It was faster, sharper, wider, lower, and got better gas mileage. But although it was a better car, was it a better sports car?

To begin, we have to define what a sports car is. By definition, a sports car is “a low built car designed for performance at high speeds.” As car enthusiasts, we can all agree that there’s more to this. In my opinion, a sports car is a car built with the driving experience as the only priority; everything else is an afterthought. A perfect example of this would be the 986 Boxster. The first gen Boxster was impractical, got terrible gas mileage, the engine frequently blew up, the interior smelled funny, it was a terrible car to drive daily. Despite all these drawbacks, it still remains one of the most fun and enjoyable cars to drive on a canyon road. The reason for this was simple, its only purpose was to be driven hard on a canyon road. It just wasn’t built for sitting in traffic and taking the kids to school every day. The 986 Boxster was a true sports car.

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Photo Credit: HERE

 

The 911 is in essence the same. It started off as a true, no compromise sports car, but at the years went on, it became more and more comfortable, wider, longer, and more practical. Up until the 997 generation, this really wasn’t a problem. I mean, the 997.2 was just as fun to drive as any other 911, but it was also a really nice car. After that though, things changed. I keep using the 991 as an example since it was really the first time a 911 could be a legitimate daily driver. All you had to do was put the PDK transmission in automatic mode, turn on the AC, and cruise. Every 911 after the 991 followed this pattern, they became less 986 Boxster and more BMW M6. This was great for the Beverly Hills housewife who wanted to show off her new Porsche convertible, but it took away the raw, uncompromised nature Porsche purists had fallen in love with.

So here’s where the answer to our initial question comes. Is the Porsche 911 still a true sports car? Kind of. I say this because compared to the 911s of old, the 992 is not a sports car. It’s 8 speed PDK, comfy ride, and touch screens simply cannot match the raw, uncompromised, mechanical driving dynamic of older 911 models. But, and there’s a BIG but, compared to the “sports cars” of today, the new 911 is the most engaging, raw, and driver focused sports car you can buy. Despite all the changes and revisions over the years, the 911 hasn’t lost its true roots; at least not as much as its competitors. The BMW M3 for example, is a completely different car now than it was 15 years ago. 15 years ago we had the legendary E46 M3. A car with no compromises, a legendary engine, and one of the best driving dynamics ever implemented into a road car. Modern M4s simply can’t compete in terms of driving experience, the only thing the cars have in common is their lineage; otherwise, they’re as different as Ferrari and Fiat. Compare this to a 996 911 and a 992. Sure the 996 might feel better and more engaging to drive, but you can tell that the 992 is still a 911.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Porsche’s aim with the 911 has always been evolution instead of revolution and I think that’s saved them in the long run because in all honestly, a no compromise sports car simply would not sell as well as a more luxurious counterpart. What Porsche has done with the 992 is that they’ve built a sports car for 2019, not 1999.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

 

 

 

 

The 997 911: The First Choice for a Second-Hand Porsche

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Photo Credit: @teamanarchyy @danovinpirnazari

Porsche enthusiasts are a very unique group of people. These people are so passionate about the brand that it often leads to bitter conflicts among them. But, one consensus that they all seem to agree on was that the 997 was a pretty good 911. The water cooled fans generally agree that it provided the perfect combination of luxury and driver engagement and air cooled purists seem to agree that it was the best that a water cooled Porsche could offer. Unlike with air cooled 911s, the market seems to be rather less sympathetic towards the 997 since one could easily pick up a Carrera model for anywhere from $25,000-$60,000; which is well within the reach of the average sports car enthusiast. That brings us to this, 997.1 911 Carrera which shows that although the 997 is getting old, it still remains to be the best 911 for the price.

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Photo Credit: @teamanarchyy @danovinpirnazari

Styling

In my opinion, the 997.2 generation is the most beautiful 911 ever made. The size, the curves, the lines, everything is just perfect. And although the 997.1 is not as beautiful as its successor, it’s not a bad looking car. It’s got the classic 911 silhouette, it’s not too big, it doesn’t have the much disliked fried egg headlights of the 996, there’s really no bad angle for the car. The 997.1 also looks relatively modern considering it’s almost 15 years old.

Interior

Looks wise, the interior is what stands out on the 997.1. It’s simple, elegant, and driver focused. The seats are in the right place, the center console isn’t cluttered with unnecessary bluetooth and wireless calling options. It’s a sports car and the interior reflects it. The 997.1 is also a Porsche keep in mind so everything short of the volume and tuner dials for the radio are built with the utmost quality. There’s lots of nice leather, there’s no scratchy plastic like in the 996, it’s a very nice place to be.

Reliability

In general, Porsches are very well built cars, especially the newer ones. Sadly though, the 996 generation that preceded the 997 was not one of these newer ones. Of all the things wrong with that car, the most notable was the reliability of the M96 engine that powered it. For those that don’t know, the M96 was notorious for its IMS and RMS failures, it was by far one of the worst engines Porsche had ever built. And that M96 engine was unfortunately carried over to the 997 Carrera, Carrera 4, and Targa 4. But there is some light at the end of the tunnel since the M96s fitted to later 997.1 models, like the 2007 Carrera we tested, had been cleared of most of these problems. The Carrera we tested had almost 50,000 miles on it and ZERO mechanical problems. The car ran like a clock and showed no signs of stopping anytime soon. Honestly though, as long as you treat the engine well i.e. change the oil frequently, let it warm up before pushing it, etc. you should be fine.

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Photo Credit: @teamanarchyy @danovinpirnazari

How it Drives

As of this writing, it’s been almost a year since RS Report was started. In that year, I’ve had the honor of being able to review so many amazing cars so trust me when I say that the 997.1 Carrera that we reviewed is the Goldilocks of performance cars. The steering feel is light enough to make quick maneuvers yet heavy enough to feel the road. With the sport chrono package (which is a must), the throttle response in “Sport Mode” is perfect for shredding through a canyon, and perfect for everyday driving in comfort mode. Everything in this car seems to be just right. But don’t let this commentary fool you into thinking that the 997.1 Carrera is a slow car, by any means.

The “base” model that we tested made 337 hp (325 hp stock) and 273 lb/ft of torque while weighing in at just 3,075 lbs. This power to weight ratio can still compete with the 991 Carrera, BMW M4, and all the new sports cars of today. This is a fast car, plain and simple. This low weight makes cornering a breeze, the car is very quick on its feet in the canyons and stable on the straightaways.

The 6 speed manual in our car was amazing as well. The clutch was perfect for fast upshifts and the engine revved so perfectly for the downshifts. The shifter is so perfect and precise, it’s like operating a rifle bolt.

And the sound, oh that beautiful sound. Each section of the rev range is accompanied by it’s own symphony. From 1,000-3,000 rpm you get the angry base tone of an old RSR racecar. From 3,000-5,500 rpm the angry base crescendos into a violent roar and right at 5,500 rpm, you get this beautiful resonance that marks the transition to that signature Porsche howl all the way to redline. Finally, you shift gears and get the encore you’ve been waiting for all the way to this car’s 177 mph top speed.

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Photo Credit: @teamanarchyy @danovinpirnazari

The Verdict

The 997.1 911 is easily the best sports car under $60,000. Also keep in mind that our review was conducted in a non S Carrera without PASM or carbon ceramic brakes. Just imagine what those would add. Driving this car was an experience, the dazzling looks, the eviscerating sound, the smell of the leather, it all combined to make the ultimate driving experience. The 997 911 is without a doubt, the BEST sports car under $60,000.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

 

The Porsche 911 GT3 Turns 20

With the 996 GT3 introduced in 1999, 2019 marks the 20th anniversary of the GT3. If that black hunk of metal with a wing running round the Nurburgring means anything, we can expect the 992 GT3 to be released at this year’s Frankfurt Motorshow just in time for the 20th anniversary.

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The 996 generation wasn’t received too well by 911 enthusiasts. The new water cooled Mezger engine simply didn’t have the signature whirr of the belt driven fan of the air cooled engine. However, as many enthusiasts will tell you, the 996 GT3 has so many beautiful engine sounds that you’ll forget about what cools it. Despite base Carrera owners being unimpressed by their new 996s, GT3 owners were happy to report that it had great weight distribution and amazing throttle response due to the super light flighwheel. With max torque at 5,000 RPM, and max horsepower at 7,200 RPM, this new water cooled engine was definitely happier close to redline, which was almost 8,000 RPM.

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The 997 GT3 took the standard set by the 996 to an even higher level. An increase of .2 L brought the 997 to a 3.8L Flat 6 which now made 415 hp (435 hp for the 997.2 GT3), a huge jump compared to the 996’s 375 hp. With the updated design came a more modern nose an a much sharper rear, making the GT3 look as slick as it performed. The newly designed wing also looked much more efficient than the 996 generation. Also, the 997 GT3 was the first GT3 to have PASM, also known as Porsche Adjustable Suspension Management.

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Even though many praised the system, some enthusiasts were fearful that the 911 was creeping farther and farther from its roots since it now used an electronic suspension system. I have one thing to say to these people. Get with the times. If you want an air cooled 911 with ancient underpinnings then go ahead and buy a 930 or a 964. Porsche can’t stay behind the competition just to please the purists. And this is coming from a purist!

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The 991 GT3 still maintained it’s “GT3ness” despite major updates from the 997. Among other things, the new car came only with a PDK; the first GT3 with a dual clutch transmission. It also had rear wheel steering, making it the ultimate track toy anyone could ask for. The 991.1 had a 3.8L 475 horsepower Flat 6 but the face lifted 991.2 brought it home with a 4.0L Flat 6 making a clean 500 horsepower. The facelift brought back a manual option at no extra cost! The touring package was first offered on the 991.2 which removed the rear wing to give the GT3 a more subtle look. You can read our review of the 991 GT3 here. It’s truly the perfect balance of both track and road use. That flat 6 makes heavenly noises all throughout the rpm spectrum.

As the 992 GT3 roams around the Nürburgring, we can only wonder what Porsche has in store for us. Will there be a hybrid system? Will it have active aero? Will it be lighter and more hardcore? We can only wonder. One thing is for sure though. The GT3’s legacy will live on for many years to come!

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As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Espo Porsche: Showing Why Air Cooled 911s Are So Great

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Photo Credit: @espo.porsche

This week, we had the honor of visiting a Porsche enthusiast’s dream: Espo Porsche. Espo Porsche is basically your one stop shop for Porsches, they will literally work on anything from a 356 to a Cayenne. The shop was started by John Esposito in 2010, with the aim of combining proper craftsmanship with Porsche’s loyal fanbase.
John is a true artist, when it comes to cars. Since junior high, John had taken his schools’ autoshop classes, developing his hands on skills along with his passion for cars. It’s no surprise that right after high school, he went to work at a body shop. It was these body shops that inspired John’s love for Porsches, he was always surrounded by them. Although HE loved the cars, it didn’t seem that the places he worked for shared his passion and attention to detail. “They hacked the Porsches there, hacked them terribly. Uneven panel gaps all around,” he said. It was this poor quality work that motivated him to open up his own shop, to do things the right way. John ended up building is his first 911 in 2014 (a 911SCRS recreation) and opened Espo Porsche‘s current shop in 2010. He has been working on Porsches for over 47 years.

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Photo Credit: @espo.porsche

If there was one thing we took away from our interview, it was that there’s nothing like an old 911, nothing at all. He went on and on about how new Porsches are too “sterile” (aka luxurious) and not focused solely on driving pleasure. I could imagine the scene right then and there. Imagine carving up the canyons in a 1973 (he said 1969-1973 911s are the best) 911S. You didn’t have many features, but you also didn’t have any distractions. Just you and the open road with nothing but time, this was what we as the car community had been looking for with modern cars. I realized that with all this technology, cars aren’t as fun to drive anymore. We don’t hear the true engine, rather an exhaust muffled by turbos. We don’t feel the roads with the steering, we can’t even shift our own gears for God’s sake. I now understood why air cooled Porsches have shot up so high in value, people miss this feeling.

This was emphasized even more when we were shown how easy it was to work on these old cars. With 4 bolts, you could drop the engine and fix whatever you wanted, the steel chassis were easy to reinforce and repair if needed be. Porsche knew people would be driving their 911s, and they built them like so. The engines were made of steel rather than plastic, there were no complicated electronics that would break. Everything was mechanical, everything was simpler. Today’s aluminum 911 bodies are lighter, that’s a fact, but they’re not as easy to repair, the same goes for the plastic engine components.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Today’s cars are truly excellent, and mind mindbogglingly fast, but they’re missing something, something that the charts can say. They’re missing that special aura about them, “No one’s gonna restore a 996.” Thanks to Espo Porsche, I learned that in order to save the sports car, we need not to look towards the future (electric motors and more tech) but to the past; that’s when sports cars were truly about the art of driving.

Before I end this article, I would like to thank everyone at Espo Porsche for inviting us over and truly reviving our passion for air cooled 911s. A special thanks to John for the interview and to @womeninporsche for giving us a tour of the amazing facility!

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!