The 992 Turbo Has Been Leaked!

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Porsche has been teasing us time and time again with the upcoming 992 models. First, the GT3s spotted at the Nurburgring, then the Turbos, then the GT3 Touring and that one weird 911 Turbo with a ducktail (still don’t know what that is). They finally gave us something with the 992 GT3 in their Superbowl commercial but then went back to radio silence after that. But now, NOW we finally have something.

Just weeks before its official reveal at the 2020 Geneva Motorshow, pictures of the new 992 911 Turbo S have been leaked, and it’s very interesting to say the least.

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Now don’t get me wrong. I think that in person especially, the 992 is a very beautiful 911. From some angles, I think it even looks better than my personal favorite, the 997.2. However, the biggest problem with the 992 design in my opinion was that it’s design was too fine tuned in a way for the Carrera models. It’s like the color black and yellow. Both can be amazing colors for cars, yet more cars can look good in black whereas only a few can look just as good in yellow. The 991 design (especially the 991.2) is a perfect, jet black metallic. It’s beautiful in all variations, has very clean lines, width, everything. The 992 on the other hand, seems more like a Dakar Yellow for all you BMW fans out there. It looks great as a Carrera, or Carrera S, but I’m not so sure about a Turbo or GT3.

I mean, judge for yourself, but I just don’t think the 992 Turbo is as jaw dropping as a 991 Turbo. The front is too pointy, and the squared edges don’t do service to the Turbo’s elegant curves and menacing stance. The side profile however, which I think is the 992 does best, is very pleasing; it’s very “Turbo” like along with the rear, which is much less bulbous that the 992 Carrera. The front just kills in in my opinion.

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The 992 design language does raise questions though about more extreme models, like the GT3 per say. The way the 992 is designed points more towards subtlety rather than the extravagance that we see with the GT models. Wings and aerokits just don’t seem to be the 992’s thing, I mean, just look at the 992 Carrera S with the aerokit…it’s hideous.

I hope Porsche takes this into account with the design of their GT cars because if not, we’re going to have some really fast, but really ugly cars. I guess it’s all about what’s on the inside now.

What do you think, are we being too harsh on the 992 Turbo? What do you think of the new 992 design? We’d love to hear what you think!

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The C7 Corvette: Bargain of the Century

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Before I start this article, I would first like to thank @roman_radenski for trusting us with his beautiful C7. Thank you so much Roman for taking to time out of your day to let us review your car and for just being a cool guy in general. You rock!

I’ll be honest, I’m not the biggest fan of American cars. I don’t fit in them very well, and I don’t think they drive that well compared to European cars. There are exceptions though, aka the Mustang GT350; I LOVE that car. That being said, it would be safe to say that I don’t really like the Corvette and if we didn’t review the C7, you would be right. I would say they are too cheaply made and the engineering is about as advanced as the computer I’m writing this article on (hint: it’s a literal dinosaur). But today, everything changed. We finally drove a Corvette, and what a car.

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Specs

First let’s get the specs out of the way and then I’ll tell you why I LOVE this car almost as much as a GT350 (did I mention I’m in love with the GT350?). Stock, the C7 Corvette Stingray comes powered by a naturally aspirated 6.2 liter V8 called the LT1 that makes a very respectable 455 hp and 460 lb/ft of torque. Since it only weighs about 3,300 pounds, 60 mph happens in just 3.7 seconds and the Vette will happily shove its way up to 186 mph if given enough tarmac. Not bad at all I might say, this is a pretty fast car.

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Looks and Interior

Except for the C4 and C5, Corvettes have been pretty good looking cars. The C7 is no different. I loved the lines, the angles, everything on this car was crisp and clean as can be. Especially in red.

But the interior was what really impressed me. I have been making fun of GM and their cheap scratchy plastic interiors for as long as I can remember. I was ready to have the time of my life when I saw @roman_radenski’s beautiful C7. I was wrong, very wrong. Roman’s car was equipped with the LT3 interior package and I’m proud to say that the interior of the C7 is a very nice place to be. The cockpit was draped in beautiful red leather, contrasted stitching, and great materials. My only gripe though was that the infotainment looked a bit cheap, but I’ve seen worse on more expensive cars. Also, the instrument cluster and heads up display is up there with that of a Lamborghini Huracan Performante. Well done GM.

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How it Drives

For a pure weekend only sports car, the Corvette is not what you want; get a Porsche 911. But if you want the most fun daily driver, the Vette is your car. It’s comfy, it’s fun to drive, spacious, and that LT1 V8 sounds ungodly. This car will put a smile on your face. The only problem with the Vette as a daily driver is that it gets horrible gas mileage; I frankly don’t care.

The engine is responsive, and there’s so much torque. When you accelerate, it’s like your being pushed into another dimension. You get captivated by the engine’s growl, the revs start to climb, you get pushed back into your seat, and the next thing you know, you’re going 100 mph on the street.

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The steering is electric, you can feel that, but when the C7 is in track mode, the EPAS system is among the best. With the Z51 package, you get stiffer suspension and some amazing Brembos to stop you right in place. The car changes direction with such ease, it’s truly amazing. One gripe I have though is that the Corvette is not, and does not feel like a small car. It’s no land yacht, but it’s no 911 either.

My other gripe is with the transmission. This goes back to the Vette being a great daily driver. Roman’s Corvette was equipped with GM’s new 8 speed automatic gearbox. When in drive, shifts are smooth and fast, no problem what so ever. But when in manual mode, there is some delay between clicking the paddle and actually upshifting or downshifting. The transmission also feels rather sluggish; it’s great for a daily, but if I’m driving it on the weekends, I’d personally take a manual.

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Why You Should Buy One

From what I’ve said during this article, it would seem like the Corvette is a good sports car, not great, but good. Now let me tell you why all the problems I mentioned are irrelevant and why the Corvette is not good, or great, but amazing.

The C7 corvette starts at $55,000 plus $5,000 for the Z51 Package which you should definitely buy. So for about $60k, you get a good sports car with a great engine, and a good driving experience. A Porsche 911 on the other hand (a great car with an amazing driving experience) starts at over $97,000 dollars. For less that $10,000, you can eliminate ALL the flaws I listed with the Corvette and then some. Basically, a manual transmission and some weight reduction will take the Corvette from good to AMAZING.

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Thank you again @roman_radenski

Roman’s Vette had some insane bolt on upgrades, a exhaust straight from God himself, and one of the nicest body kits I’ve seen on a production car. His car made about 550 hp to the crank (100 hp more than stock) and drove like a monster. With all the money he spent on mods he would still have more than $20,000 to spend before he could buy a base 911 with no options. The Corvette is ALL about performance, and it’s an incredible bargain.

I have nothing but respect for it.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

 

The 718 GT4 and Spyder Are About to Get A Lot Faster

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Back in 2015 (that’s 5 years ago, can you believe it?) Porsche gave us the Cayman GT4 and Boxster Spyder. The Cayman and Boxster finally got the power upgrade they so desperately needed, and they came exclusively with a 6 speed manual transmission just as God intended. It’s safe to say that they were pretty amazing cars, despite their long gearing, and slightly detuned 911 engines. The 981 GT4 and Spyder really left us wondering what Porsche could improve on if they brought these models back for the next generation. Well, we waited, and waited, and waited, and after 4 years of 4 cylinder Boxsters and Caymans, we finally got what we were waiting for in the June of 2019. The 718 versions of the GT4 and Spyder were better than ever (especially the Spyder) and again, they came exclusively with three pedals. Well, a new report from Evo Magazine suggests that things are about to change.

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See, with the 981 generation, the GT4 and Spyder were more special edition cars rather than full production models. They were made for only one year, and not too many of them were produced (hence their really high resale values before the 718s came out). This time, it’s different. After seeing how customers flipped their limited production, manual only cars like the 911 R without even driving them, Porsche decided to make the new 718 Spyder and GT4 regular production cars, like the Cayman S or Boxster GTS. This new mass market approach combined with an even heavier focus on track use begged the question: would there be a PDK?

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At first, it seemed not, but now Evo’ new report suggests that the PDK is going to be an option for 718 GT4s and Spyders later this year. If this is the case, this could mean BAD news for 911 owners…let me explain.

The biggest problem with the 981 GT4 and Spyder (the 718s still have this problem too) was that their gearing was way too long; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd particularly. 1st gear in these cars maxed out at 49 mph, 2nd gear maxed out at 83 mph, and the limit for 3rd was 114 mph, which is insane! For comparison, my 997.1 911 maxes 1st at around 38 mph, 2nd at around 70 mph, and 3rd around 102 (don’t ask how I know that). This is considered standard gearing for sports cars, as it provides a healthy balance between top speed and acceleration while allowing you to shift your heart out in the canyons.

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When reviewing the 981 GT4, Motor Trend did a calculation and they found that if the GT4 had standard gearing, the 0-60 time would drop from the claimed 4.1 seconds to around 3.5. That was faster than every 911 short of the GT3 at the time, and it would be even faster for the more powerful 718 variants. So unless Porsche decides to completely screw up the gearing for their 7 speed PDK, these PDK equipped 718 GT4s and Spyders are going to completely walk 992s in a straight line. I love the 911, don’t get me wrong, but I think it’s time for the Cayman and Boxster to have it’s time to shine. For real this time. What do you think?

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Porsche Unveils the 992 GT3…Sort Of

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Photo Credit:HERE

For the 3% of our audience that is outside the US, today is America’s famous Superbowl Sunday. Personally, I’m not much of a football fan, but I really do love to watch the Superbowl commercials; it’s become a family tradition of mine. Anyway, this year Porsche has their own bespoke ad, and there’s something rather special about it. The ad is centered around the Porsche Taycan but Porsche for a split second, gave us a sneak peak of the 992 GT3. I think it’s beautiful.

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Photo Credit: HERE

The short glimpse we do get is of the side profile and it’s safe to say a lot has changed compared to the 991 GT3. The wing, for one thing, is much larger than the previous gen 991.2’s wing. It seems more like an RS spoiler than a base GT3. Now this has me wondering, what will they do with the GT3RS (we know this is a base GT3 since it doesn’t have the side intakes unique to the GT3RS)? Also, we FINALLY get some new wheels for the GT3 models!! Ever since 2014 Porsche has been using the same flower-pedal wheels for the GT3 and GT3RS models with zero updates and these new wheels really suit the car in my opinion.

From what we know, the new GT3 will NOT be turbocharged. Power will come from a modified version of the 4.0 liter naturally aspirated flat 6 found in the current 911 Speedster. We don’t know power or torque numbers but we’re expecting something around the ballpark of 550 hp, not bad at all for a GT3. And with that massive new wing, the 992 GT3 is going to be FAST. I wouldn’t be surprised if it sets a sub 7 minute Nurburgring lap.

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Photo Credit:HERE

However, the ad does raise some questions, not about the new GT3, but about the 992 Turbo. Neither cars have been officially revealed yet, but Porsche’s usual precedent is to reveal the 911 Turbo before the GT3. If this was the case for the 992, shouldn’t they be leaking the 992 Turbo instead of the GT3? We’ve had a lot of rumors circulating around the 992 Turbo and NOTHING has even been teased by Porsche. There are rumors that it’ll have over 600 hp, that the Turbo S will be a hybrid, the list goes on and on. These are some pretty weird times for Porsche, and I wouldn’t be surprised if something big is on the horizon.

Let me know what you guys think about the situation with the upcoming 992 GT3 and Turbo, we’ll see what the future holds for us. I hope you all have a fantastic Superbowl Sunday with your family and friends.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The Base Carrera’s Identity Crisis

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Photo Credit: HERE

As of this writing, there are over 30 different variations of Porsche 911. You have the Carreras, the Turbos, GT3s, GT2s, then cabriolet versions, and then all wheel drive versions of cabriolets, the list goes on. But, at the very bottom of the list lies the humble 911 Carrera. Sadly, time has not been so kind on this amazing sports car.

Back during the 996, the base Carrera was the fastest 2 wheel Carrera model you could buy; the only S model was the 4S. And compared to the other 996 cars, the base Carrera was a very respectable car. Towards the end of its, life-cycle, it was making around 320 hp, only weighed around 3,000 lbs, it was nimble, responsive, a great car to drive. Then with the 997 generation, the gap started to widen. The Carrera came powered by the same M96 motor as the 996, except this time making 325 hp (wow, 5 hp, I know) while the Carrera S got the 3.8 liter M97 motor with 355 hp along with all the suspension upgrades, bigger brakes, and performance goodies we’ve come to expect from the S. The Carrera was still very enjoyable, but now there was a very viable reason to go for the S.

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Fast forward to the 992 generation and it seems like Porsche has all but abandoned this once loved sports car. The 992 Carrera still gets a 3.0 liter twin turbo flat 6 but with a lack luster 379 hp, that’s 10 more than the previous 991.2 and over 70 hp LESS than the 450 hp Carrera S. And for the base model, you get the tiny steel brakes, smaller 19/20″ staggered rims which looks way worse than the S rims, and you don’t even get the option for a manual anymore. When I used to work in Beverly Hills, I’d see base Carreras all the time which were probably just leases that people who could care less about cars drove just to show off. And with the 992, it’ll likely be even more so.

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I understand that this makes them money, and that enthusiasts can just buy the S but that’s not what Porsches are about. They’re drivers cars, meant for tearing up Angeles Crest on a cool Sunday morning, not sitting in traffic on Wilshire Blvd. And it’s not like the 911 is that good of a daily driver, they’re way too stiff to drive on a daily basis. But I’m not one to just sit there and complain, I do have a solution.

If Porsche wants to be in the luxury car market, they should, just not with the 911. Would it be a problem, if Porsche saved the 911 for the enthusiasts and made a purpose built luxury coupe? Perhaps a revival of the 928? I mean, it wouldn’t require too much engineering, they’d just have to shorten the Panamera into a 2 door and use the same engine like what Mercedes and BMW do. That way, they’d have a proper daily drivable luxury car so the soccer moms of Beverly Hills can enjoy their daily commute while us car enthusiasts can have our beloved 911 for the weekends. What do you think?

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

 

The Porsche 718 GTS 4.0: What a True GTS Should Be

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Photo Credit: HERE

When the 718 Cayman and Boxster debuted a few years back, I really wasn’t that impressed. Sure they were fast and all, but their turbocharged flat fours really didn’t impress me, journalists seemed to agree. I have to say though, after having driven a 718 Boxster S, it was way more fun than I expected, but the engine note left lots to be desired. Everyone, and I mean everyone, begged and begged for a flat 6 in the 718. We missed the sound and the emotion of those beautiful engines in the 981 generation. And Porsche, I’m still surprised they did this, actually listened. Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you, the Porsche 718 Boxster and Cayman GTS 4.0.

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Photo Credit: HERE

I guess Porsche wasn’t kidding when they said they were going to use their modified 9A2 engine from the GT4 and Spyder in other cars. Both the Boxster and Cayman GTS 4.0 come-as their name suggests-powered by a slightly detuned version of the 4.0 liter naturally aspirated flat 6 from the GT4 and Spyder. In the GTS, this engine makes a healthy 394 hp and 309 lb/ft of torque, which is 29 hp more and a few lb/ft of torque less than the outgoing 4 cylinder; not to mention, this thing revs all the way to 7,800 RPM. The even better news, is that it all comes standard with Porsche’s signature 6 speed manual. 0-60 happens in just 4.3 seconds and the cars top out at 182 mph, which is no joke. A PDK however, has not been announced (probably because it would be faster than the manual only GT4 and Spyder). Pricing is high though with the Cayman coming in at $87,000 while the Boxster will charge a hefty $100,450. I guess fun isn’t cheap.

Aside from being literally one of the best cars Porsche has made in years and setting a precedent for the automotive community for brands to listen to their customers (I’m talking to you BMW, no one likes big kidney grilles), the 718 GTS 4.0 did something else that could change Porsches forever.

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Photo Credit: HERE

See, the GTS nameplate started off back in the early 2010s when Porsche revealed the first ever 911 Carrera GTS as a last hurrah for the 997.2 911. This “special” moniker has now become a staple of every single car Porsche has made to this day as the bridge between the S models and the higher Turbo or GT3 models. The GTS is literally just a fully loaded S with some unique badging and a cheaper price for said options. Those who have driven GTS cars say you barely notice the differences on the road. But with the 718 GTS 4.0, there’s now a legitimate reason to buy the GTS trim other than to show off to your friends. Of course, you get all the goodies like the old ones but this time you get a new engine, it’s a completely different car. Personally, I hope this trickles down to the 911 too so maybe we’ll get a 4.0 liter naturally aspirated 992 GTS? Maybe?

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Photo Credit: HERE

Anyway, regardless of what Porsche does to their next GTS cars, the 718 GTS 4.0 is definitely a keeper. It combines the excellent driving dynamics of a 718 with a proper flat 6. What’s not to love?

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The Most Important Porsches of the 2010s

With the start of 2020 comes not only a new year, but an entirely new decade. The roaring 20s are back and the cars of the 2020s are just getting started. But as we step into this new era, it’s important to take a look at the past just to see how far we’ve come. Here are the most important Porsches of the 2010s.

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997.2 911 Turbo

Introduced back in 2009, the 997.2 generation 911 is arguably the brand’s best. With gorgeous, modern styling and old fashioned Porsche driving dynamics, it’s really hard to hate the 997.2. What’s important about this generation’s 911 Turbo in particular, is that this was the last 911 Turbo to feature a 6 speed manual. That’s right, back in 2010, you could pick up a 911 Turbo with a 3.8 liter twin turbo flat 6, 500 hp, and 6 speed manual. What a day that would be, huh?

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997.2 911 GT2RS

Today, the 911 GT2RS is more like a GT3RS with a 911 Turbo engine. It’s refined, fast as can be, and relatively easy to drive. Well, back in the day, the GT2RS was basically a 911 Turbo with the dial cranked up to 11; simple, yet so amazing. With a 3.6 liter twin turbo flat 6, 620 hp, rear wheel drive, and a curb weight of 3,020 pounds, the 997.2 GT2RS demolished the competition of its day, not to mention it has no trouble leaving modern supercars in the dust. The 997.2 GT2RS was also the last GT2 to come with 3 pedals, long live the manual.

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997.2 GT3RS 4.0

Dig around in any Porsche forum, and you’re bound to hear the name, “Mezger.” Well, Hans Mezger has designed most, if not all of Porsche’s greatest engines. His work with the 911 was most notably the engines in the 996 and 997 GT and Turbo cars. This man is a true genius and his last masterpiece when it came to 911s was the M97/74 engine, also known as the 4.0 in the 997.2 GT3RS 4.0. Making 500 hp, and weighing less the 3,000 lbs, the 911 GT3RS 4.0 was a real treat, a legend among legends basically. In my opinion, the GT3RS 4.0 is the greatest 911 ever made, not to mention it was the last Porsche with an RS badge to have a manual transmission.

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Macan

Taking a break from sports cars, I think it’s very important that we recognize the Porsche Macan. Since it was introduced around 2015, the Macan has consistently been Porsche’s best selling model. This is important because a lot of the money used to fund research for Porsche’s sports cars likely came from Macan sales. So, as long as Porsche has the Macan, it will have a consistent stream of income, which is nothing to complain about. I think we owe a thank you to this little crossover.

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918 Spyder

The Porsche 918 Spyder needs no introduction. When it first debuted, it was one of the fastest, and most technologically advanced hypercars ever made. The 918 was a leading pioneer in hybrid technology among performance cars, not to mention it was the first ever production car to lap the Nurburgring in under 7 minutes. With a 4.6 liter naturally aspirated V8 and two electric motors, the 918 made 887 hp, 944 lb/ft of torque and could launch to 60 mph in as little as 2.2 seconds! Even with today’s advances in technology and design, the Porsche 918 still remains a force to be reckoned with.

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981 Cayman GT4

Matt Farah (@thesmokingtire) has a distinct term for what Porsche has been doing to the Cayman and Boxster. The theory is, that no matter how good the Cayman and Boxster get, Porsche always makes sure that the 911 is better. And up until the GT4, we had every reason to believe this theory which was called the “Cayman Complex.” But when the Cayman GT4 first came out, it left the world speechless. The 981 GT4 was the first time that Porsche’s GT Division had gotten their hands on a Cayman, and it was arguably one of the best sports cars ever made. It was light, small, fun to drive, and not too expensive either. It also came stock with GT3 suspension and a 911 motor which made the GT4 VERY fast. it drove all the 911 enthusiasts nuts!

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991.1 911 R

I mentioned earlier that the 911 GT3RS 4.0 was the last Porsche RS car to have a manual transmission. This was due to the fact that Porsche thought its customers did not want manuals, and that they only wanted the fastest car possible. The 911 R proved them wrong. With today’s Porsche’s there is a trend which involves bringing back the manual transmission. Well, it all started back with the 911R. The 911R was essentially a GT3RS, without all the aero and the PDK. It was what Porsche had always intended the 911 to be, a bare bones, driver focused sports car. It was brilliant, and its resale value proved it.

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991.2 911 Carrera Models

As much as I love the 911, I can’t lie to myself and say that the car radically changes every generation. The concept of evolution rather than revolution is what’s defined the 911 over the years, but I think the most important change with the 911 of this decade came with the 991.2 Carrera models. This change came in the form of a 3.0 liter twin turbo flat 6. It was with the 991.2 generation that all 911 models except the GT3 and GT3Rs became turbocharged, and it was controversial to say the least. Numbers wise, this new engine was better in every way, but it just lacked the sound and emotion of its naturally aspirated predecessor. So for the future, I’m just glad the 911 has a flat 6, but if I were to choose one, I’d go for an NA motor.

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718 Spyder

With the 981 generation of Caymans and Boxsters, it was only the Cayman GT4 that got the true “GT treatment.” The 981 Boxster Spyder was kind of left out in that regard. This was not the case with the 718 Spyder. The new 718 Spyder is the first ever Boxster created by Porsche’s GT division and is miles better than its predecessor. With its naturally aspirated 4.0 liter flat 6 and its 8,000 rpm redline, there really isn’t much to complain about. It’s a phenomenal car, and a true GT Porsche.

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Porsche Taycan

Out of this entire list, I feel that the Porsche Taycan is the most important. Like it or not, electric cars are the future, and Porsche’s first ever electric car is a HUGE deal. Despite its inefficiencies and astronomical price tag, the Taycan is an amazing car. It brings top tier luxury, and Porsche performance to a segment that desperately needed it. The Taycan is Porsche’s first step into the future, and there is lots more to come.

Which Porsches do you think were the most important of this decade? Were there any that I missed? Feel free to leave a comment and let me know. Happy New Year!

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!