The Naturally Aspirated 911 Is Living On Borrowed Time

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Photo Credit: HERE

It was only about 5 years ago when the only Porsche 911 to have a turbocharged engine was the 911 Turbo. Now, everything except the GT3 and GT3RS have twin turbocharged flat 6 engines, for better or for worse. The current 9A2 Evo engine powering the 992 911 is an engineering marvel to say the least. Just think about it. This engine extracts 450 hp out of just 3.0 liters reliably. That’s the same power that the legendary 997 GT3RS made with its 3.8 liter racing engine. But that’s the trend these days. Automakers are trying to get as much horsepower out of the least amount of displacement as emissions restrictions get stricter and stricter. Well, long story short, that’s about to change.

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In order to force automakers to switch to electric powertrains, the new EU7 regulations set to go into effect by 2026, are going to set a legal limit on horsepower according to displacement. For example, a 3.0 liter engine can only make 400 hp. The only way automakers can adapt to this is by increasing engine size, and doing that will cause their engines to produce more emissions (see where this is going?).

This is bad news for our beloved Porsche 911 which only has 6 cylinders to work with. By 2026 expect the Porsche 911 to have “20 percent more displacement on average for these EU7-capable engines.” Most companies will probably switch to cheaper, electric drivetrains, but what about Porsche?

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For now, we can say with confidence that a naturally aspirated base 911 is dead; there’s no way for them to make an adequate amount of power without turbos. As for the only naturally aspirated models like the GT3, they’ll be living on borrowed time, and will likely suffer the same fate as the Carrera models.

Personally, I’m not a fan of the turbo engines, but I can live with them. What worries me is the question of whether or not the 911 will be able to maintain its status as a lightweight sports car. Engines are heavy, and with these new regulations calling for bigger engines, I’m worried about whether or not Porsche will be able to keep the 911’s weight at a minimum. The 992 is the biggest and heaviest 911 yet and with these new regulations, I guess they’ll just keep getting bigger.

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So I guess in this case, bigger doesn’t mean better. But there is some good news for American Porsche fans. Porsche hasn’t ruled out making different engines for countries with looser emissions regulations (i.e. America) so we might get the smallest blow. The future for Europe however, remains uncertain. So if you’re reading this in Europe, enjoy it while you still can my friend.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The BMW Z3 M Coupe:A Tiny Car With A Big Attitude

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The BMW Z3 Roadster started off as BMW’s answer to the Mazda Miata. It was a small, lightweight, retro roadster designed to be a fun little sports car. Aside from it being very light, it wasn’t anything special. But the head of the Z3 project, Mr. Burkhard Göschel, wanted something more, something faster. A flimsy roadster was not the way to go, he needed a rigid coupe; so he made one, literally. The Z3 Coupe M Coupe started its life in the shadows, being secretly developed by Göschel and his team of engineers. And the car that started as a secret skunkworks project by a group of BMW engineers was unveiled at the 1997 Frankfurt Motor Show, with the M Coupe arriving shortly after in 1998. To add to the story, very few were ever made, the car we reviewed was 1 of just 26 black on black slick tops.

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The Looks

You can tell right away from the outside that the M Coupe is an “engineer’s car.” With its long hood and shooting brake body style, to the flared rear fenders and that unique smile, you either love it or you hate it. Seeing the car in pictures, I thought it looked pretty stupid, not gonna lie. In pictures, the car just looks awkward; its proportions are weird, its stance is too high, it’s just not a pleasant sight. Then I saw it in person, and I’m glad to say that the design is really starting to grow. It’s such a tiny car yet its design is so big and flamboyant, I can’t help but to fall in love with it. Long story short, don’t buy this car for Instagram.

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Photo Credit: HERE

The Interior

You’re going to hear me say the word “cool” a lot to describe the M Coupe and for good reason. It’s just a really cool car. This applies to the interior especially.

Open the door and you’re greeted with one of the most badass car interiors I’ve ever seen. Everything from the heavily bolstered seats to the little chrome trimmed dials on the center console is perfect for the car. And the gauges, how could I forget those? They’re so elegant, yet so smooth. The first thing you see is the beautiful chrome trim and then you see the words “M Coupe” written under the rev counter; you know you’re in something special.

The interior quality is exactly what you would expect from a top of the line BMW. The materials are great, the leather is in perfect shape, it’s just a great place to be.

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How It Drives

Now that we’ve gotten through all the boring stuff, it’s about time I tell you how this thing drives. The car I drove was had BMW’s S52 inline 3 engine. With 240 hp and 236 lbs/ft of torque, this 3.2 liter engine feels a lot stronger in an M Coupe than it does in an E36 M3 since the M Coupe weighs in at just 3,064 lbs (over 100lbs lighter than the M3). When I say this car is a pocket rocket, I mean it. The gearing is short, meaning 60 mph comes in just over 5 seconds but the tops speed is rather low at 136 mph.

The best way I can describe the driving feel is that it’s the love child of an E36 M3 and a 986 Boxster. It’s such a small car, and you’re reminded of that every time you put your foot down or send it into a corner; it’s as nimble as any mid engined sports car. But then you have that amazing engine, which is so crisp, and so beautifully connected to that 5 speed manual transmission, it’s like nothing else.

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Now the M Coupe has amazing handling, don’t get me wrong, but this thing will drift. My friend Billy (the owner) comapares it to an old Porsche 911 in that aspect. This car will spin its tires like there’s no tomorrow. First gear, second gear, on dry roads too. You have to know what you’re doing if you want to go fast.

And then there’s the sound, oh that glorious sound. As you climb up the rev range, you get that signature mechanical song of a proper BMW inline 6. Around redline, it kind of howls like a Porsche too which is an added bonus.

Things like steering feel and seating position are so nice compared to newer cars. You can actually feel the road when you drive, and you feel like you’re actually in the car rather than on top of it. It’s no Porsche, but boy does it get close. The ride is great too, I would not mind dailying this car at all.

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Verdict

I think I’ve made it very clear that the M Coupe is one of my favorite cars. It looks great, sounds great, drives great, what’s not to love? When you drive one, you know you’re driving a piece of BMW history; I mean, you’re literally in something that wasn’t supposed to exist. It’s just so cool, and such a blast to drive, it’s no wonder they’re shooting up in value.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Porsche’s New Accessory Raises A Question About Classic Cars

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Photo Credit: HERE

A classic Porsche, is truly something special. Many in fact, argue that the Porsches of new are nothing compared to their air-cooled brethren. They would rather have a 944 Turbo over a new Cayman or a 993 Carrera RS over a 991.2 GT3RS. I honestly can’t blame them, the old cars just have something special about them and arguably feel better to drive. But there is one thing the newer cars have that the old cars simply cannot match: good infotainment. Things like bluetooth radio and Apple Car Play unfortunately did not exist up until a few years ago, and that can be a big pain for anyone with an older car-Porsches included. I for example find it easier to play Spotify through my phone than to try and connect it to my 986 Boxster’s radio. But Porsche now has a solution: PCCM.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Originally introduced in 2015, PCCM, or “Porsche Classic Communication Management,” is a high quality, modern infotainment setup meant to replace those in older models. In my opinion, it looks fantastic. It’s very clean, subtle, and doesn’t really disturb the vintage character of the car. As of this year, PCCM is being upgraded with Apple Car Play, which is a plus to many. More importantly though, Porsche has decided to expand their PCCM upgrade to newer cars like the 986 Boxster and the 996 911.

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Photo Credit: HERE

PCCM Plus (the one for the 986 and 996) features a 7 inch touchscreen with all the modern amenities including Android Auto which isn’t included in new Porsches surprisingly. The system is pricy though, costing $1,555 for PCCM and $1,735 for PCCM Plus, so I’d probably save it for a 996 Carrera or GT3 instead of buying it for my $8,000 986.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Now all this tech is cool, don’t get my wrong, but should we really be fitting modern features into classic cars? To be completely honest, I totally understand the side of those who wouldn’t but if I had a classic Porsche, I would definitely get this. PCCM isn’t some tacky aftermarket radio, it’s a carefully designed, genuine Porsche product. With PCCM you can carve up a canyon road in your 993 Turbo listening to your favorite Spotify playlist without a care in the world. I say it’s a great buy for anyone who owns a piece of Porsche history.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Living With The Volkswagen GTI

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The humble Volkswagen Golf has been around since 1974 and is currently in its 8th generation-not bad I must say. It’s small, practical, cheap, and pretty reliable if you treat it right. Now take this little economy car, strap a turbo to it, and you get the GTI; this little pocket rocket is bound to make you smile.

Thanks to our friend, Lorenzo (@thespeedyguidy) we have been able to live with a very special GTI for the last week, and the car has been very impressive to say the least. Definitely not what we expected.

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The Looks and Interior

Judging by the looks, the GTI just looks like a tastefully modified VW Golf. Now, that’s not a bad thing; the 7th Generation Golf is rather handsome for what it is, but it’s not very eye catching if you know what I mean.

Interior wise though, things start to get good. Keep in mind that this is a Volkswagen, not a Rolls Royce, but if you option leather seats-which our car had-the interior is a very nice place to be. The seats are comfortable for long road trips, yet they still manage to hold you very tight when you decide to do some spirited driving.

Keep in mind, the car is German so everything is pretty easy to find and operate. However, I do have one gripe with the interior, the infotainment in particular. Now I don’t know if this is because there is a flaw or because Lorenzo’s car just didn’t like me, but the bluetooth audio decided to mute my music every time I got a notification on my phone, and didn’t raise the volume back up. That got really annoying really fast. Also, I couldn’t really figure out how to switch off the car’s hillstart assist which is not a deal breaker by any means, but it took some getting used to.

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Practicality

I’ll say it right now, if you want a fun, cheap, practical daily driver, the GTI is easily one of your Top 5 best choices, probably Top 3 if you’re looking for a new car. It’s spacious, comfortable, and very easy to drive. Lorenzo is a man of taste so he got his car with the 6 speed manual, and I know what it’s like to daily a manual in LA traffic so trust me when I say this is the lightest clutch you’ll ever operate. The car is so easy to drive and with that hill assist, traffic jams are a breeze. It’s also got plenty of space to take friends, pets, groceries, you name it; this is a great daily driver. Plus, it’s only a 4 cylinder so you can get great gas mileage, 24 city/34 highway.

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How It Drives

This is where the fun begins. For those that don’t know, the GTI is powered by a turbocharged 2.0 liter 4 cylinder engine that pushes out 217 hp and 258 lbs/ft of torque; Lorenzo’s car has the performance package which boosts power up to 227 hp (torque stays the same). I know, it really doesn’t sound like much, but the key word here is, “turbo.” I said the GTI was fun, not fast, but when that turbo spools up, I found myself grinning from ear to ear. It’s so funny because under normal load, it’s just like any boring old 4 cylinder but when you get on the throttle, this thing flies. The turbo lag is so atrociously bad that you can’t help but laugh and do it again. This thing picks up speed too once that turbo gets going (I’m smiling right now just thinking about it).

For what it is, the driving feel is not bad at all. Sure the engine revs drop too slow to shift fast and the driving feel is nothing compared to say a Porsche, but for a FWD hatchback, it doesn’t get much better than this.

Again, I would like to thank Lorenzo for lending us his car to review. Lorenzo has been there for us since the very beginning and we can’t thank him enough for this opportunity. We really owe him one. Aside from being a great guy and passionate enthusiast, Lorenzo also has an Instagram page (@thespeedyguidy) and a YouTube channel where he uploads amazing car reviews (The Speedy Guidy). I would definitely recommend checking it out. He also has a cool podcast (@comininclutchshow).

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The Porsche 918’s Successor Will NOT Be Fully Electric

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Photo Credit: HERE

Believe it or not, the Porsche 918 ended production 5 years ago, I know right. And up until a few months ago, we had only gotten hints that a successor would  be coming in the following years; not much else. That was until Porsche unveiled their stunning 917 Concept Study model, hinting at what the future had to offer. Then again, that really didn’t mean much considering it was nothing more than a drawing brought to life meant to be a tribute to the legendary 917 racecar. That changed today.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Thanks to the Dutch news site, Autovisie, we now have leaked patent images from Porsche of what very well may be, the next 918. As you can see, the design is HEAVILY based off of the 917 Concept Study we saw just a few months ago. And judging by all the detail, angles, and features, this looks very much like a production car to be. Oh, and it’s pretty beautiful too.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Now, I know what you’re thinking. “So what, it’s just a basic drawing,” and I guess you would be right. However, if you look at the back, you can clearly see two exhaust pipes sticking out of the car. This tells us two very important details about the car. One, the new car will have some sort of combustion engine which is huge since previously, we thought it would be electric. And two, this car is likely coming much sooner than we thought. Let me elaborate on that.

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Photo Credit: HERE

When asked about whether or not they’d be making an electric hypercar, Porsche stated time and time again that they were waiting for battery technology to improve before they went through with such a project (they wanted batteries to be lighter). So assuming Porsche is staying true to their word, it’s very likely that Porsche decided that they didn’t want to wait for lighter batteries, they wanted to make the car now.

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Photo Credit: HERE

It would make sense too, considering that in a year or two, we’re going to have cars like the Aston Martin Valkyrie, the AMG One, and the McLaren Speedtail. Not to mention all the new electric hypercars that’ll hit the market. I guess Porsche wants a piece of the pie now, and I’m so glad they’re using a combustion engine. This is gonna be good…I can feel it.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The 718 GT4RS Might Be Coming With GT3 Levels Of Power

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It can be argued that the Cayman GT4 is one of the best Porsches made in the last 15 years. It’s fast, lightweight, good looking, and a joy to drive-many would prefer it to a 911 as a matter of fact. Now ever since the 981 generation GT4 was unveiled, there were rumors about a faster and even more powerful GT4RS model. For the 981 generation, the rumors were just that, rumors. That is not the case for the 982 (718) generation.

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There have been constant spyshots and Nurburgring sightings of a heavily modified 718 GT4 sporting a PDK transmission. This is definitely the RS. But we’ve known this for months, this is old news. What we didn’t know until now, was this new monster’s power output. Predictions back when sightings first emerged ranged around the 450-475 range. This seemed pretty reasonable. Enough horsepower to make the GT4RS fast, but not as fast as a GT3. Long story short, we were wrong…very wrong.

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Photo Credit: HERE

As of this week, rumors have surfaced that the GT4RS could be packing as much as 500 hp from its naturally aspirated 4.0 Liter Flat 6. Given that the current 718 GT4 weighs around 3200 lbs, its pretty safe to assume that this new GT4RS could very well have a power-to-weight ratio similar to, if not better than, a 991 GT3. Combine that with its new, revised chassis, a mid engined layout, and a PDK transmission, and you’ve got yourself one serious track toy.

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This begs the question: will Porsche do anything to make the GT4RS slower than a 911? For those that don’t know, in the world of Porsche, the 911 reigns supreme. A Cayman/Boxster can NEVER be faster than the 911. We’ve seen Porsche make sure of this in every generation of Cayman/Boxster. Whether it’s restricting the exhaust to get less power (986 Boxster) or giving the cars unnecessarily long gearing (current and previous GT4/Spyders), Porsche always does something. But just the fact that they’re actually going through with a GT4RS could mean that there will be no restrictions this time. Porsche could very well be going all out on this new GT4RS project. If so, what will that spell for the GT3? Only time will tell.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The Man, The Myth, The Legend: Hans Mezger

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If you’ve ever been on a Porsche forum, or to a Porsche meet, or anything regarding Porsches, you’ve probably heard the name, Mezger. People love to go on and on about how their cars have the “legendary Mezger engine.” I’ve seen so many vanity plates for 997 GT3s and Turbos just by driving around LA. The name has been thrown around so much that I think few people even know where it comes from. Let’s talk about Hans Mezger.

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Mezger began working for Porsche in 1957 and his work ended up making Porsche what it is today. Don’t believe me? He was designed the 911’s (then called 901) original 2.0 liter flat 6 engine! Yeah, that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Mezger’s greatest contribution came in the form of the Porsche 917. The flat 12 that brought Porsche its first victory in the 24 Hours of Le Mans was designed by none other than Mezger.

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His two part aluminum crank case design became the base of all the 911s with “Mezger” engines; that’s where the name comes from. The Mezger engine represents arguably the best of the best for the 911 in terms of performance and reliability. The original design for this particular engine originated from the 911 GT1, and it was then carried over to all the 996 and 997 GT and Turbo cars.

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In it’s ultimate spec, Mezger’s 911 engine took the form of that found in the 911 GT3RS 4.0. Making 500 hp without forced induction is a strong feat even today, let alone back in 2012. The 3.8 liter version of this street engine ended up winning 13th overall in the 24 Hours of Le Mans (in street legal 997.2 GT3RS’ might I add). So long story short, Mezger’s a pretty cool guy with some incredible achievement under his belt. Thankfully it was Porsche that took him in and not Ferrari.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!