Formula E: Porsche’s Next Step Towards World Domination

Formula E Cover
Photo Credit: HERE

Few words go together like Porsche and motorsport. Throughout its history, Porsche has competed in nearly every category, and won at least once. Indy cars, Formula 1, GTE, Rally Racing; if it exists, Porsche has competed in it, with two exceptions. The first being Formula E and the second being NASCAR; but I think it’s safe to say that we won’t see Brad Keslowski sporting a Porsche Panamera stock car anytime soon. Formula E however, that’s a different story.

It’s no secret that Porsche is becoming a key player in the electric car scene. With the emergence of the Porsche Taycan, along with hybrid monsters like the 918 Spyder and the Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid, it was only a matter of time before Porsche Motorsport got involved; it seems that time has come because Porsche has just revealed that they will be competing in Formula E racing.

Formula E Turning
Photo Credit: HERE

Porsche’s path towards world domination has been divided into different eras. You had the Le Mans era, the rallying era, etc. It seems that whatever is popular at the time, Porsche gets involved with it. Most recently, it was LMP1 racing with the Porsche 919. Formula E racing is filling in the gap that retiring from LMP1 has left behind, as Porsche announced it will completely withdraw from that class of racing and focus on Formula E instead.

This was likely done because as we all know, the racetrack is the ultimate testing ground for new technology. Tech we take for granted like carbon monocoque chassis’, active aero, and carbon ceramic brakes all bloomed from racing. It only makes sense now that Formula E is becoming the new proving ground for emerging electric car technology.

Formula E Side Good
Photo Credit: HERE

Yesterday however, Porsche took the next step, and officially revealed its Formula E car, and it looks stunning, very Porsche-ish as well. Being a new racecar, specifications are unannounced but based on Formula E regulations, expect a sub 3 second 0-60 time and about 335 hp, and since this is Porsche, expect many future wins as well.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

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The Porsche 917 Concept Study: The Perfect Road Car?

917 Concept Study Cover
Photo Credit: HERE

Let’s be honest, the car world is not perfect. Every car has its flaws. Some are too big, some are too small, some have a small engine, others have too big of an engine; the list goes on and on. Because of this, our minds are constantly plagued with “what ifs.” What if the Ferrari 488 didn’t have turbos, what if the Porsche GT3 had more power, what if McLarens had souls? I don’t know about you, but I could literally spend all day thinking about “what if” scenarios for cars. Out of all of these, one has truly stuck out to me,”What if Porsche built a 917 road car?”

917 30 RS Report
Photo Credit: HERE

The Porsche 917 was as Porsche called it, “The most famous racing car of all time,” having won them their first victory at the 24 Hours of Le Mans and countless other victories for many decades, in many different divisions. One day when I was little, I was looking through my dad’s old Porsche magazines and on one of the pages, there was a spec list for all the 917s ever made. As a kid, and even now, I was always obsessed with the numbers. I knew every horsepower figure, engine size and 0-60 of any car that you could mention, so you could imagine my excitement when I read that a Porsche had 1200 horsepower, a flat 12, and 1200 hp. Even as a 7 year old, my first thought was, “Why don’t they use this engine in a road car?”

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Photo Credit: HERE

Eventually, I found out that this magical car that I had read about was none other than the legendary Porsche 917, specifically the 917/30, the crazy turbocharged one. A few years later, I got my first phone and with that came the magic that was YouTube. I was now watching Top Gear on the daily and falling in love with cars even more. One day, I don’t know why, the memory of the Porsche 917 popped into my head and with that, the same question of why it wasn’t a road car. With that, another question came into my head,”What did this flat 12 even sound like?” Within 5 minutes, I was blown away by videos of the 917K screaming down the straightaways followed by the nuclear blasts that they called downshifts. (Link to that video HERE). This made me wonder even more why Porsche hadn’t put this godly engine in a road car.

917K Back
Photo Credit: HERE

Fast forward to a few days ago, when Porsche unveiled the 917 Concept Study at the Geneva Motor Show. The 917 Concept Study is a stunning interpretation of what a modern day Porsche 917 would look like, a celebration of the Porsche 917’s 50th anniversary. Long story short, it’s the closest thing we’ll get to a 917 road car. Imagine the scene now: you’re cruising down the Pacific Coast Highway in a road legal 917, rowing your own gears, listening to the howl of 12 angry cylinders right behind your head. You approach a tunnel, your nerves tense, the hair on the back of your neck stands up as you downshift, heeling and toeing ever so perfectly as you hear the engine crackle, then, everything goes silent, you have entered the tunnel. But out of nowhere, you unleash all 12 angry beasts behind you, their howls echoing off the tunnel walls as you blast into hyperspace. Name me a more perfect moment, name me a more perfect car.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

 

A Monster: The Porsche 919 Evo Part II

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Photo Credit: HERE

“But the 919 wasn’t dead yet, because Porsche had something very special up its sleeve, something VERY fast, something you’ll be able to read about next week in part II of the 919’s story…”

The Porsche 919’s racing career came to an end after Porsche decided to retire the monster after the 2017 LMP1 racing season. Normally, when a racecar is retired, one of three things will happen to it. The remaining examples will either be showcased in a museum, they will be locked away in an automotive warehouse, or they will be auctioned off to some very wealthy collectors-we hope to collect many iconic racecars in the coming years. All famous racecars from the Ferrari 250 GTO to the Porsche 911 GT1, and even the Porsche 917, suffered this fate, but not the 919. Porsche had something the world had never seen before hidden up its sleeve.

919 Victory
Photo Credit: HERE

When the 919 was built, Porsche knew they had created something special, perhaps something as special as the 917, but the 919 had one major, deal breaking flaw: it was a racecar. Since Porsche had built the 919 as a racecar, they had to comply with hundreds if not thousands of ridiculous FIA Racing Regulations. For example, cars must weigh a minimum of 1920 lb, they can be no longer than 183 inches, and they must be between 71 and 75 inches wide. Now these regulations are great for creating fair and entertaining races; they help make a level playing field, and races dependent on the skill of the drivers. But they are not ideal if one would want to make the fastest car possible.

919 Evo Back
Photo Credit: HERE

After the 919 was retired, Porsche decided to make the 919 Evo, a tribute car to the legacy of the 919, but that’s what Porsche tells us. They made an event out of the creation of the Evo called the “919 Tribute Tour,” where Porsche would take the new 919 Evo to motor shows and racetracks all around the world. This is purely speculation, but I believe that this whole tribute tour was just an excuse by Porsche to build the fastest car the world had ever seen. To create the Evo, Porsche took the “standard” 919, and broke just about every single FIA regulation in the book.

Originally, the 919’s 2.0 liter V4 engine made about 500 hp and the electric motors made about 400 hp due to FIA regulations. But since the 919 wasn’t competing anymore power was upped to 710 hp and the electric motors’ output was increased to 434 hp. This resulted in a combined power output of about 1144 hp! As if weight was an issue, Porsche made the featherweight-like 1929 lb 919 even lighter, with the Evo weighing in at an astonishing 1872 lb dry (a brand new GT2RS weighs 3241 lb). The Evo also received some extreme aerodynamic upgrades which improved downforce by 53% compared to the 2017 spec Porsche 919. With the Evo, Porsche had cut the chains off of a hungry bear, and the result was 0-300 kph in 8 seconds, let that sink in.

The first of many lap records that the Evo broke was at the Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps. The 919 Evo set a lap time of 1:41.77 with an average speed of 152.6 mph. This lap was 0.783 seconds faster than the previous record of 1:42.553 set by Louis Hamilton in his Mercedes F1 car…NOTHING IS SUPPOSED TO BE FASTER THAN AN F1 CAR! Compared to the “standard” 919, the Evo was 12 seconds faster, which is about 3 years in the world of car racing where milliseconds make all the difference. Spa wasn’t the only record on the Evo’s kill list, it was after something more, something “unbeatable”.

919 and 956
Photo Credit: HERE

Next stop for the 919 Evo, the Nurburgring Norschleife, aka the Green Hell. Porsche was after the all time record for the Nurburgring, the “unbeatable record set by the Porsche 956 over 35 years ago, when the Nurburgring was much shorter (12.944 miles versus today’s. 16.12 miles). The record lap set by the 956 was a warp-like 6:11.13…the Evo did it in 5:19.55, earning it the title of the world’s fastest car, period.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

A Monster: The Porsche 919 Part I

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It’s not every day that someone beats the “unbeatable” all time lap record on the Nurburgring Nordschlife, and it’s no surprise that the car was a Porsche. Back in 1983, racing driver Stefan Bellof set the all time lap record on the Nurburgring during a Grand Prix event. Bellof was driving a then new, Porsche 956 racecar which made about 620 hp from a 2.65 liter twin turbo flat 6 engine. But what made the astonishing 6 minute, 11.13 second lap (the current production car record is 6:40) possible was the 956’s revolutionary aerodynamic profile. Similar to the racecars of today, the wide and low under-body of the 956 created a ground effect (much like having a massive diffuser) which surmounted to unprecedented amounts of downforce and of course, a record breaking lap. The 6:11.13 lap was so fast in fact, it stayed as the Nordschlife’s all time lap record for 35 years; only a racecar of the highest caliber could break this “unbeatable” record, enter the Porsche 919.

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Photo Credit: HERE

The story of the 919 started on June 11, 2012, when the project was first announced by Porsche. They announced that they were going to build a hybrid racecar (unheard of at the time) to compete in the emerging LMP1-H class of racecars. The 919 was going to be Porsche’s first sport-prototype car raced in 2 years since the legendary Porsche RS Spyder was retired in 2010. The 919 was also going to be the first Porsche sports-protoype racecar to race in the highest category of FIA sports car racing since the 911 GT1.

About a year after its announcement, Mark Webber began testing of Porsche’s completed 919 test chassis , and the finished 919 racecar made its official public debut on December 14, 2013. The finished car sported a low displacement, turbocharged 2.0 liter V4 engine which was hatched to a sophisticated, state of the art electric hybrid system that developed warp like acceleration and mind boggling speeds.

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The 919 made its racing debut at the 2014 6 Hours of Silverstone race, racing in the 6 MJ subclass of the LMP1-H series and finishing third in its first ever race. Its first season came to a rough end however at the 24 Race of Le Mans, where the No.14 car suffered from a broken anti roll bar and was forced out of the race. The 919 scored 194 points and finished 3rd place in the LMP1-H class, not bad for a first season, but unacceptable from a Porsche.

In 2015 however, the 919 was back in full swing, having been completely redesigned and ready to win which it did, winning the 24 Hours of Le Mans that year along with the 5 races that followed. In the 2015 season, the 919 scored a total of 344 points and scored 1st. The 919 continued to dominate the LMP1 series, winning the next two 24 Hours of Le Mans races and becoming one of Porsche’s most dominant racecars ever until it was officially retired in 2017.

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But the 919 wasn’t dead yet, because Porsche had something very special up its sleeve, something VERY fast, something you’ll be able to read about next week in part II of the 919’s story.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Porsche’s Legendary Era of GT1 Racing: Part II

 

98 GT1
Photo Credit to @instacar_enthusiast on Instagram

After the two disappointing seasons for the 911 GT1 and GT1 Evo, Porsche decided that they needed an all new GT1 car that resembled more of a sports prototype. They wanted to at least match the performance of their rivals, the Toyota GT-One, the new V8 Mercedes CLK GTR, and the BMW V12 LM. The new car was dubbed the 911 GT1-98. The ‘98’ represented the year in which the car competed in GT1, 1998.

There were 2 standards for Porsche to reach. They wanted the car to compete and to be competitive. In order for it to compete, Porsche had to make at least one street legal version, a Straßenversion. That was exactly what Porsche did, they made only one Straßenversion in a pure white livery. Information is very limited about this car. After all, only one was produced. Porsche only brings it out to major car events such as the Goodwood Festival of Speed. Estimated launch price was $900,000, just like the previous Straßenversion. You could buy ten 996 911 Carreras for that money.

GT1 98 Street
Photo Credit: HERE

For the GT1-98 to be competitive, Porsche fitted it with a 3.2 liter twin turbo flat 6 engine that produced 550 horsepower and 465 pound feet of torque. This monster of an engine was mated to all new sequential gearbox which allowed the car to shift significantly faster than before. The new double wishbone suspension helped the car corner at higher speeds and reduce body roll. It only weighed 2,095 lbs (950 kg) because all of the body panels were made out of carbon fiber. Even the chassis was made out of this wonderful material. It had a top speed of 193 mph with the high downforce setup. However, it reached 205 mph at Le Mans with a low downforce setup.

GT1 Speed
Photo Credit: HERE

Obviously this was no ordinary 996. The only parts shared with the 996 911 (the car that was supposedly the base of the GT1-98) were the headlights and taillights, just like previous generations of the 911 GT1s. Bob Wallek, a driver for Porsche, said “The GT1-98 has more grip, is easier to drive, conserves the tires, is faster and has a stiffer chassis.” Similarly, Porsche’s engineer, Herbert Ampferer, said,“The new GT1 was supposed to slim down by ten percent compared to the old one,” referring to the weight of the car.

Porsche knew that the GT1-98 was slower than its rivals, most noticeably the Mercedes CLK GTR. The air flow restrictions were unfavorable for Porsche because their engine was turbocharged, unlike the CLK GTR’s new naturally aspirated V8. However, luck was on their side at Le Mans in 1998. The Toyota GT-One was troubled with gearbox reliability, the BMW V12 LM was out of the race because of wheel bearing problems, and the Mercedes CLK GTR was troubled with the oil pumps for the new V8. Porsche had a clear opening for a win and they took a one-two finish at that year’s Le Mans, making it their 16th win, a new record. That’s Porsche reliability for you.

GT1 98
Photo Credit: HERE

Trouble struck at the Petite Le Mans race at Road Atlanta. Yannick Dalmas, the driver of one of the GT1-98s, was speeding through a crest as air caught the underbody. The force of the air acting on the underbody coupled with the mid mounted flat six caused the car to do an entire backflip in mid air and land on the rear bumper, causing the tank to crack and light the car on fire. After the backflip, the car veered into the side barriers. Yannick Dalmas came rough unscathed. In 1999 the CLK GTR had the same crash and in 2000 the BMW V12 LM had the same crash in the same race as the 911 GT1-98.

The golden era of GT1 was over that year, all manufacturers pulled out the series and only Mercedes remained. The new FIA GT championship was overridden with GT2 cars. Porsche could have competed, but they decided not to defend their lucky win at Le Mans in 1998. After that, only LMP prototypes won and recently Porsche raced their 919. Please leave a comment if you’d like to hear about the 919 next week!

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Porsche’s Legendary Era of GT1 Racing: Part I

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When I was a child, I was a massive fan of Hot Wheels. It fueled my car obsession before I had discovered Top Gear. I collected them for many years, but one car always stood out to me. It didn’t look like any other car I had seen before. The aggressive low cut front end, the vented hood and wheel arches, the roof scoop, the extended wheelbase, the massive ducktail and high rising wing kept me wondering what car it could have been. All I could recognize were the 2 “fried egg” headlights from the 996 911. But as I peered underneath the car to discover the plastic under tray with the make and model I discovered that, yes, it was in fact, a 996 911. But the three characters in front of 996 911 were the ones that confused me. What could GT1 possibly mean? Why did the car look completely different just because GT1 was added to its name?

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Photo Credit: HERE

GT1 was a form of FIA Championships in the 1990s. Porsche made 3 GT1 based cars during this era of legendary racing. The first GT1 car was based on the 993, the second was based on the first one with minor revisions, and the third was based on the 996. These 911s would have to race against some of the most important names in Le Mans history, such as the McLaren F1 GTR, the Mercedes CLK GTR, and the Toyota GT-One. These cars were the pinnacle of the automobile, the absolute extreme of what the manufacturers could achieve. The reason behind these three new GT1 cars being produced was the disappointing season for the 962. It was too outdated and could not keep up with the competition. The F1 GTRs were dominating in the Le Mans endurance race and Porsche could not endure being on the losing side. The 993 911 GT1 was born.

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The 993 911 GT1 was introduced in 1996. Nobert Singer, who had been responsible for every Porsche that had competed in Le Mans, was given the 993 911 and the objective to make it a Le Mans monster. He took the front end of a 993, attached it to a custom built tubular frame and a monocoque chassis. Then he attached it to the rear of a 962 to produce this Frankenstein of the car world. It had a watercooled twin turbo 3.2 liter flat six that made 590 horsepower and 479 pound feet of torque. The flat six was mounted longitudinally and was connected to a 6 speed manual transmission. It reached 100 kph (62 mph) in 3.7 seconds and hit a top speed of 307 kph (191 mph), however during Le Mans the car achieved 320 kph (205 mph) on the La Sarthe straight. To help achieve this, all of the body panels on this car were changed; the only parts shared with the original car were the headlights and taillights.

 

Even the staple of the 911-its rear mounted engine-was moved to become mid engined in order to aid weight distribution and aerodynamics. The 993 911 GT1 was revealed to the public at the 4 Hours of Brands Hatch endurance race and took a 1-2 finish. It finished 5th overall, and third in its class.

During this era of FIA regulations, manufacturers were forced produce at least one production car for the race car to be based on. Instead of Porsche wasting their time producing the next generation of 911 and not focusing enough on the GT1 car, they decided to produce a “Homologation Special” called the 911 GT1 Straßenversion (which translates to street version).

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Photo Credit: HERE

The Straßenversion had the same twin turbo 3.2 liter flat six, however it was detuned to 532 horsepower , mainly because of emissions regulations in Europe at the time. The ground clearance was increased, the suspension was softened and the car was given a more comfortable interior. The difference in the 0-100 kph (62 mph) time was 0.2 seconds; from 3.7 seconds to 3.9 seconds. Even though regulations called for 25 cars, Porsche produced 23 units of the Straßenversion; all were sold to the public with one being delivered to the German government. As for the price, a clean $912,000 out of your bank account.

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Photo Credit: HERE

The new GT1 car was mechanically identical to the previous GT1 car. Minor revisions led to the name 911 GT1 Evo (Evolution). The biggest difference between the old GT1 and the GT1 Evo were the new headlights and taillights, which previewed the next generation 911 lights, also referred to as the “fried egg headlights.” The aerodynamics were revised in order to increase downforce and reduce drag. The wing was adjustable based on top speed or handling preferences and it weighed only 1,050 kg (2,310 lb).

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Photo Credit: HERE

Unfortunately, the car was plagued with reliability problems and did not cover the full race distance. This motivated Porsche to work harder and smarter for the next season of the FIA World Endurance Championship and boy, did they deliver with the successor of the GT1 Evo, the 996 based GT1-98. Make sure to come back next week to hear the exhilarating story behind it, including nearly fatal crashes and increasing competitiveness between the manufacturers participating.

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Photo Credit: HERE

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport: Back for Round 2

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Photo Credit: https://cdn.motor1.com/images/mgl/OjJlM/s3/new-porsche-718-cayman-gt4-clubsport.jpg

It’s safe to say that the 981 generation Porsche Cayman GT4 was an excellent road car. It had good power, brakes, suspension, sound, and most importantly a 6 speed manual transmission. It’s no wonder everyone loved it. It was pretty fast too. Thanks to its low curb weight and 385 hp 3.8 liter flat 6 engine from the 911 Carrera S, the GT4 made the 0-60 sprint in 4.1 seconds and topped out at 183 mph; certainly no slouch. Thanks to its mid engine layout, handling was exceptional too.

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Photo Credit: https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwii1ZHfrNrfAhVh4oMKHb8lBd4QjRx6BAgBEAU&url=http%3A%2F%2Fgtspirit.com%2F2016%2F09%2F28%2Fporsche-cayman-gt4-clubsport-clubsport-mr-review%2F&psig=AOvVaw2CaqJRnB86esg1sz5pgHal&ust=1546904589425158

But it didn’t stop there because just after the GT4 was unveiled, Porsche Motorsport got their hands on one and voila, the Cayman GT4 Clubsport was born. Much like the newer GT2RS Clubsport, the GT4 Clubsport was a track only racecar version of the Cayman GT4. With a stripped out interior, race ready gearbox, and other little racy bits here and there, the Cayman GT4 Clubsport was ready to put an instant smile on any track day enthusiast’s face. Porsche sold 421 of these racecars before production ended, a pretty large number.

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Photo Credit:  https://cnet1.cbsistatic.com/img/8YmZmhuSSXbi_CIzSgQXF9KcF68=/1600×900/2019/01/03/6be96de1-9eab-46c1-a972-185a16403a17/porsche-718-cayman-gt4-clubsport-14.jpg

For the 718 Cayman Porsche is doing things a bit backwards this generation with its revealing of the new 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport first; the road car is yet to be seen. For the second time around, the 718 Clubsport uses the now discontinued 3.8 liter engine from the previous generation GT4, except now with a revised intake manifold that brings a 40 hp increase (385 hp-425 hp). Like the previous generation, the new 718 Clubsport features a stripped out interior, a FIA spec roll cage, bucket seat, and a six point racing harness to keep the driver in place during hard corners. The 718 GT4 Clubsport also features the same light weight spring strut front suspension used in the 911 GT3 Cup Car.The new 718 GT4 Clubsport is also the first production racecar to use body parts made from natural fiber composite materials like flax and hemp fibers. With properties comparable to that of carbon fiber, these new natural fiber composite materials have been used to construct both the wing and doors of the new 718 Clubsport. Because of this and other weight saving features, the new 718  GT4 Clubsport tips the scales at just 2,910 lbs.

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Photo Credit: https://files1.porsche.com/filestore/galleryimagerwd/multimedia/none/motorsport-racingcars-982-718-c7-gt4-cs-gallery-03/zoom2/9b5a1888-feeb-11e8-8373-0019999cd470;sK/porsche-motorsport-image.jpg

Also available this time around is the choice of two different variants for the 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport. Amateur track day enthusiasts can opt for the $154,743 Trackday variant with fixed shock absorbers, air conditioning, electronic stability control, and traction control. For more experienced and even professional racing drivers, Porsche has the Competition version with 3 way adjustable shocks, and a more adjustable brake system. The Competition also features a massive 30.3 gallon fuel tank to cope with long distance events. Both variants are built to race with FIA certified parts.

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Photo Credit: https://car-images.bauersecure.com/pagefiles/72654/5_porsche-718-cayman-gt4.jpg

But let’s be honest, most of us here aren’t looking to buy a full-fledged racecar, we’re more into street cars (i.e. the 718 Cayman GT4). If that’s the case, the Clubsport offers us lots of insight into what the GT4 roadcar will be like, except for one thing…the engine. Porsche has stated that the engine used in the Clubsport will not be the engine used in the roadcar. But Porsche has also stated it won’t be a turbocharged 4 cylinder like all the other 718 cars. By process of elimination, we can infer that the new 718 Cayman GT4 will feature a likely detuned version of the 4.0 liter naturally aspirated flat 6 engine found in the 911 GT3. I can’t wait!

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to like and share this article with your friends and follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!