Is Porsche Making a 718 GT4RS?

 

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Photo Credit: HERE

Ah, the Nurburgring. Automotive heaven to some while a critical testing site for others. For Porsche, it’s the latter. Nearly every Porsche has been seen testing here, from the GT2RS to the Panamera, and even the new Taycan. This week though, a heavily modified Cayman was spotted swerving around the track. For those that haven’t seen it, this new Cayman looks like a track focused version of the new GT4, could this perhaps be the long awaited 718 GT4RS?

If it is though, I’m honestly not surprised, I’m sure you’re not either. I mean, I don’t know about you, but I’ve been wanting and expecting a GT4RS ever since I found out about the long gearing and de-tuned engine on the 981 gen GT4. Could it be that Porsche is finally turning the Cayman into a proper supercar? But would they even consider it?

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Photo Credit: HERE

It’s no secret that Porsche has been holding the Cayman back from reaching its full potential. Just look at my Boxster, that thing has a 2.5 liter flat 6 that barely makes 200 hp and keep in mind, the 911 that had the same M96 engine made 300 hp in 1999. If you want a more recent example, look at the gearing on both of the Cayman GT4s. 1st gear takes you up to about 46 mph while second hits the limiter at something like 81 mph! I remember Motor Trend did a calculation back in the day, that said if the 981 GT4 had Porsche’s typical 30 mph for 1st and around 60 mph for second, the 0-60 time would have gone from 4.1 seconds to around 3.6. Guess what, that’s faster than EVERY 911 short of the GT3; coincidence, I think not.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Like every other RS car, this new GT4RS features the whole 9 yards of Porsche aero upgrades. It’s got NACA ducts, louvers on the rear window to cool the engine, what looks to be small front fender vents, and its party piece, that monstrous rear wing. I don’t care how much power they suck out of the engine or how long they make the gearing, this thing will be glued to the track.

Speaking of power, Porsche has made it very clear that they intend on using the current GT4’s 4.0 liter flat six in other cars. And the current engine for the GT4 is the naturally aspirated beauty we’ve been waiting for, it’s literally just a giant middle finger to turbo charged engines…I love it. What Porsche did is that they took the 911’s 3.0 liter twin turbo flat 6, they bored it out to 4.0 liters, they changed a bunch of internals, and they cut off those soul sucking turbos just like God intended. To add some insult to injury, they also raised the engine’s redline to 8,000 rpm; this thing is a screamer. Now the question is, how much power will they extract from it, because they’ve also made it very clear that the GT4’s engine is performing far below its potential. Realistically, I’m placing my bets at around 460 hp, which is enough to make the GT4RS insanely fast, but not faster than Porsche’s precious GT3.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Or what they could do, and this is a stretch, is make the GT4RS the long awaited mid engined supercar I’ve always wanted, AKA the Porsche 960 we never got. Who knows though? All we do know, is that there are going to be some fast Caymans loose on the streets. Watch out!

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

 

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The Porsche 718 Boxster: The Next Generation of Fun in the Sun

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Ah, the Porsche 718 Boxster, a very interesting car to say the least. Back in 1997, this was the cheapest Porsche money could buy. It also wasn’t very fast, it didn’t look all that great, but it was a joy to drive. It originally came powered by a 2.5 liter flat 6 that made about 201 hp, which is a rather conservative amount if you ask me, but it did sound pretty good. Anyway, as the years went by the engine became bigger, those ugly fried egg headlights disappeared, and the Boxster grew up to become very respectable, fun to drive sports car. Then in 2016, Porsche did arguably the worst thing one could do to a sports car, they exchanged the 981 generation’s beloved flat 6 in favor of a turbo charged flat 4, creating what we now know as the 718 Boxster. To be completely honest with you, I hated it. I thought Porsche had ruined the Boxster. Sure it was faster, but there was no emotion, no passion behind a flat 4. It seemed that Porsche had given up its pursuit of the ultimate driver’s car in favor of chasing 0-60 times and gas mileage. I seemed to have forgotten what my friend Billy had always said, “Anyone who hates a sports car, has obviously never driven one.” Well, I finally drove one, and it was a hell of a lot of fun to say the least.

Technical Specifications 

Since everything seems to be a numbers game these days, let’s start off with the specs. In S form, the 718 Boxster is powered by a turbocharged 2.5 liter flat 4 that churns out a very respectable 350 hp and a muscly 309 lb/ft of torque. With all this power, a 7 speed PDK gearbox, and curb weight of 3054 lb, the 718 Boxster S sprints from 0-60 in 4 seconds flat (0.1 seconds slower than a Carrera GT might I add) and tops out at a 911-like 177 mph. Don’t let the hate fool you, the 718 is a fast car, like a REALLY fast car; much faster than the previous generation Boxster too.

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Interior/Build Quality

One of the biggest drawbacks of the 986 (first generation) Boxster was its interior quality, or lack thereof. The interior was cheap, rattly, and just a bad place to be even for a 90s car. Thankfully, one of the biggest improvements of the Boxster over the years-aside from its power gain-has been the quality of the interior. The 718’s interior is filled with high quality leather and contrasting stitching, all the buttons are in the right place, and nothing is cheap, you feel like you’re in a $80,000+ car. Unlike previous Boxsters, the 718 also comes with enough tech to make you feel old and you can tell the interior was designed with the driver in mind. Everything fits and everything makes sense, typical Porsche.

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How it Drives

Now the 718 may have killer looks, a boat load of power, and a comfy interior, but honestly, who cares? This is a sports car, and by definition it’s sole purpose is to be driven for “performance at high speeds.” As I said before, the 718 does not disappoint. The car just grips and grips and grips, there’s no better way to put it. The power, the balance, the chassis, it all feels right when going through a turn. You don’t have to wrestle it through high speed corners like you have to do in my 986 and you don’t have to worry about any under or oversteer like you would in a 911.  

Not to mention, the brakes are amazing too. These things stop you almost as fast as the car accelerates. They really give you the confidence to push the more powerful engine.

Aside from being my first time driving a 718, this was also my first time driving a Porsche with a PDK. Long story short,  I was VERY impressed. The PDK was so engaging and so blisteringly fast, I honestly didn’t think a manual would have made the drive any better, especially with that kind of power. Having a PDK meant I could focus on driving, on going even faster, it also meant launch control. And let me say, all that torque from the turbo does a really good job of turning your 718 into a racing yellow cruise missile; it’s really out of this world.

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The Sound

Going in, I thought that the 718 would be a lackluster car mostly due to the sound. But after driving it, I’m glad to say that the sound did not bother me at all. It’s really not that bad if I’m being honest. I know it’s not a flat 6 but it’s not a Honda either and hearing the turbo blow off through the side intake really put a giant smile on my face. But do I wish it had a flat 6? Yes. Will it keep me up at night though? Not at all.

 

The Verdict

Now nothing is perfect, we all know that. But when the only drawback of a car is the steering feel, you know you’ve got something special. The 718 is a real joy to drive, plain and simple. Everything feels right, everything looks right, and everything drives right. It has a 4 cylinder, so what? That just means you get a whole lot more torque thanks to that turbo. I’m happy to say that Porsche really got it right with something that could have gone so horribly wrong. Long live the sports car and long live the 718!

A special thank you to @siramg_ for letting us review his gorgeous yellow Boxster S, and for just being a really cool guy overall. Thank you for taking time out of your busy day to make mine one of the best I’ve ever had, it really means a lot. 

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

 

 

Mysterious 718 Coming With a Flat 6?

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Photo Credit: HERE

With the introduction of the 996 911 back in 1999, Porsche changed many things. They changed their cars’ engines, their design language, etc. And along with changing their cars, Porsche also introduced their current model life cycle that we know and love today. For those that don’t know, this “life cycle” starts with the unveiling of a new car or new generation of car, for example, the 997 generation of 911. Then, about 3 years down the line, Porsche introduces a slightly updated, but not entirely new version of that car, the 997.2 generation 911 for example. After about 3 years of the updated version, a whole new generation is unveiled and this cycle repeats itself. Up until 2017, Porsche used this 6-7 year life cycle for all its models, it changed with the 718 Boxster and Cayman.

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Photo Credit: HERE

What was supposed to happen according to the life cycle, was that Porsche was supposed to release a slightly updated version of the then new 981 generation Boxster and Cayman. What we got instead was an entirely new car, with an entirely new engine, chassis, etc. The introduction of the 718 Cayman and Boxster prematurely kicked off the 982 generation. As of this writing we are about 3 years into the current generation of 718 cars which could mean anything at this point. If Porsche follows the lifecycle that they recently broke, we could be in for a new, updated version of the 718 twins. Or if Porsche continues to break tradition, we could get nothing at all.

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Photo Credit: HERE

This week however, a mysterious video surfaced on YouTube which shows conclusive evidence that we are getting something, we just have no idea what it is. The video showed slightly camouflaged 718 Cayman and Boxsters speeding down the Nurburgring, pretty typical stuff. But there was something very off about these new cars, they were powered by a flat 6. That’s right, a new 718 was howling down the Nordschleife which makes me wonder, what even is it?

Could this be the new 982.2 generation, a new GT4/Spyder Touring model, an updated 718 GTS? Your guess is as good as mine. The reasoning for this new flat 6 powered 718 is also up in the air. Maybe Porsche is bringing back the flat 6 to save falling 718 sales. If this is the case, this is VERY good news because it shows that automakers-Porsche at least-are willing to replace their downsized, turbocharged models with new, naturally aspirated ones. Whatever this car was, we will likely know soon, since there wasn’t really any camouflage on the car to cover it up. But either way, it has a flat 6, like every Porsche sports car should, and that puts a big smile on my face. I can’t wait to find out what Porsche has in store!

Let us know what YOU think these mysterious 718s are and as always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The 718s Have Been Cured: The New 718 GT4 and Spyder

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Photo Credit: HERE

When the 718 twins were first revealed, Porsche was faced with hard criticism on the new 2.0L Turbocharged Flat 4 they put in place of the signature Flat 6. To place a bigger margin between the Boxster/Cayman and the 911, Porsche decided to “ruin” their mid engined sports car, according to enthusiasts. However, now these enthusiasts can rejoice! With the reveal of the new 718 Cayman GT4 and 718 Boxster Spyder, Porsche announced that these 2 hardcore versions of the 718 twins would have the 4.0L Flat 6 with 414 horsepower and 309 lb/ft of torque. The GT4 hits 189 mph while the Spyder “only” tops out at 187 mph.

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Photo Credit: HERE

The 4.0L Flat 6 might throw some enthusiasts off, since the 911 GT3 has the same displacement. Porsche actually bored out an extra liter from the Carrera S engine and removed the turbos. However, the new 718 twins boast an extra 29 horsepower over the previous generation 981 twins. The party piece of this new engine though is its 8,000 RPM redline. It’s an increase of 200 RPM over their predecessors, but reactions from enthusiasts show that it’s a significant difference.

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Photo Credit: HERE

The task for Porsche to achieve all of this wasn’t an easy one. In order to make these range topping 718s significantly better performing than their predecessors, Porsche made many changes to the Carrera S engine. Other than the fact that the turbos were removed from the engine and it was bored out by a liter, Porsche upgraded to forged pistons and a forged crankshaft. But the list doesn’t end there. The new 718s have an aluminum intake system, piezo fuel injectors, and a dry-sump oil system with a high performance oil pump.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Now, onto the handling aspect of the range topping 718s. Just like the previous GT4/Boxster, the new 718s share their front axle and brakes with the 911 GT3. The rear axle was made specifically for the GT4 and Spyder. It has a mechanical differential and PTV, also known as Porsche’s Torque Vectoring system. The 718s have PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management) and a ride height that has been reduced by 1.2 inches over the standard 718s. With these suspension tweaks comes infinitely adjustable settings for camber, toe, ride height, and anti-roll bar stiffness.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Continuing the handling theme, the new 718 GT4 has increased performance when it comes to downforce. It produces 50% more downforce than its predecessor. Although they might look similar on the outside, the new Cayman GT4 boasts a single chamber arch rear silencer leading to some real estate for a rear diffuser. The fixed rear wing, front splitter, and air curtains add 52.8 pounds of extra downforce over the previous generation GT4.

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Photo Credit: HERE

The Clubsport package is a whole different story. It turns the GT4 into a bare bones racecar ready for the track. It comes with a fire extinguisher, and a 6 point racing harness. Interestingly, it also comes with a steel roll bar, that can’t be fitted in the US due to regulations. Apparently, the US is afraid of you hitting your head on the roll bar so they banned it. In the case of the car rolling over, you can be relieved that your head won’t hit the roll bar, so the metal roof can comfort the hit instead.

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Photo Credit: HERE

The 718 Boxster Spyder is essentially a smaller version of the 911 Speedster. It replicates the double humps on the Speedster and also has an active wing. Along with the wing, the Spyder has a functional diffuser to provide downforce. The previous generation had an automatically folding roof, but with the new 718 Spyder, Porsche utilized a manually folding roof to save weight, similar to the Speedster. It is the first Boxster to ever produce downforce on the rear axle.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Of course with all of these upgrades, there is a price premium over the base 718. The Spyder costs $97,550 and the GT4 costs $100,450. The base 718 Boxster costs $59,000 and the 718 Cayman costs $56,900 so that bears the question, is it worth it? However, these models aren’t going to be limited production cars, in order to keep buyers from flipping their cars.

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Photo Credit: HERE

I interviewed Boxster and Cayman owners to hear their thoughts on the new Spyder and GT4. First off is Jennifer (@jennetic and @9.ate.7), a 987 Boxster owner. She said, “I just think that, you know it’s only plus over the old one is 1k in the RPM, it’s still 1k shy of what a real 4.0L should make. A 718 GTS shares pretty much the same numbers and the supra is faster and also 50k less. Just doesn’t convince me, it’s all a false promise of a better car.”

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David (@siramg_), a 718 Boxster owner, also had something to say. “I think we are in an extreme transitional period when it comes to cars. Moving away from N/A motors and majority of our favorite sports cars now having forced induction. While I see why we are now in forced induction era with all the benefits from efficiency, smaller displacement backing so much power, emissions, and so on. Porsche was always known for their high revving flat six power plants. When the current generation of the 718 was introduced to the public there was massive love/hate for it. While it had massive amounts of low end torque unlike its predecessor in my opinion it lacked what true Porsche cars were known for. That screaming high pitch of the flat six, you no longer needed to really rev the car out to hit the power band. But it feels awkward at times when you get on the pedal and behind you you’re hearing turbo spool and preprogrammed pops. It you come to love and appreciate the 718 for what it now is. The GT4 and Spyder were a true gift from Porsche for the true purists. For those that truly loved Porsche for what it really is an extremely driver focused raw sports car. And for that it makes them even more special. Manuals are dying out, N/A is a thing of the past. But to have it once more… wow the car gods have answered our prayers. We have Porsche to thank for that.”

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Anthony Petrossian, the co owner of RS Report owns a 986 Boxster. He said, “As Porsche said, the new GT4 and Spyder are perfectly irrational. We could have gotten more power with turbos and a faster lap time with a PDK, but it’s not about that. These cars are about the drive, they’re about that magical feeling that lap times and 0-60 times can’t measure. We need that now more than ever.”

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Photo Credit: HERE

With that, please leave a comment with your thoughts on the new 718 Spyder and GT4. As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Budget Sports Cars: Porsche 986 Boxster vs BMW E36 M3

If you had about $40,000 dollars to spend on a brand new, top of the line European sports car in the late 1990s, you would have two main choices: the tried and true BMW E36 M3 or the newly introduced Porsche Boxster. Both cars were essentially designed in completely different ways to do the exact same thing. The Porsche Boxster was a lightweight, mid engined, rear wheel drive roadster whereas the M3 was a front engined, rear wheel drive, slightly less lightweight coupe and both proudly exceeded their job of putting a massive smile on your face. Today, the debate is still rather the same but thanks depreciation, one can now pick up either of these cars for well under $15,000. Yet their new, similar price tags still beg the same question one would have asked 20 years ago, which one do you buy? Well now, we have an answer.

Technical Specifications

To start off, the BMW E36 M3 is powered by BMW’s famous S52 engine which is a 3.2 liter inline 6 producing 240 hp and 236 lb/ft of torque. The E36 is also front-engined, as mentioned before, and weighs in at around 3200 lbs. The Porsche on the other hand is powered by a 2.5 liter flat 6 that makes 201 hp and only 181 lb/ft of torque. However, it only weighs in at a feathery 2822 lbs. But despite being almost 400 lb lighter than the M3, the Boxster still has a lower power to weight ratio so Round 1 goes to the Bimmer.

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Interior/Build Quality

Since both cars are from the 1990s, interior design was not something they were known for when new. Both cars have cheap plastic bits and tacky interior designs so if you’re looking for a nice place to sit, get another car. That being said, there is a clear winner though and it’s the BMW. Even with it beings a 1990s car, the M3 still has a surprising amount of leather whereas the Boxster was criticized for having a cheap, plastic covered interior. The quality of the M3’s interior and the overall car itself is also much better despite it being a few thousand dollars cheaper than the Boxster. When you’re at high speeds, it doesn’t rattle or whistle, it feels properly put together which is sadly something I cannot say about the Porsche.

Practicality/Reliability

Let’s be honest, these cars are not going to be bought for their practicality but in case you were wondering, trunk space is the same on both cars since the Porsche has two trunks, but the BMW has back seats and a glove box so it’s a bit easier to daily drive. Being 20 year old German sports cars, reliability is also not a strong suit with each car having its own set of special problems. The M3 mainly leaks and burns oil while the Boxster has its infamous IMS bearing issue. However, early model Boxsters with the 2.5 liter engines-like the one we tested-don’t have the IMS bearing issue and overall are more mechanically sound than their BMW counterparts so reliability goes to the Porsche but not by much; these aren’t Toyotas after all.

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How They Drive

The main factor one should consider when buying these cars is how they drive, they’re sports cars for God’s sake. Honestly, you can’t really go wrong here, they both drive amazingly well. Part of this has to do with sound and thankfully, unlike their newer versions, the E36 M3 and 986 Boxster both sound exceptional. The E36 has a lower, angrier scream while the Porsche sings with its signature flat 6 howl. Determining which car sounds better is all subjective but again, you can’t go wrong with either, they both sound absolutely amazing.

The steering on both cars is also very direct and engaging, but the Porsche clearly has superior steering feel and enjoyment. In the Porsche, the wheel connects you to the road in a way that the Bimmer can’t seem to deliver.

Earlier, I mentioned that the BMW has about 39 more hp and 55 more lb/ft of torque and if there’s one thing that separates the two, it’s the torque. The Bimmer accelerates harder and is noticeably more powerful than the Porsche. Also the M3 always has power to put down whereas you really have to work the engine in the Porsche to get 40 less hp. Handling is superb on both cars but you do feel more planted in the Porsche because of its wider tires, lower power output, and its mid-engined layout, then again, the unpredictability of the BMW is one of its best features.

The Verdict

In the end, it’s all about what kind of experience you want. The Porsche makes you feel safe, it’s friendly, it doesn’t feel like it’s going to slide at every turn. The Porsche is also easy to master, not once have I felt the car struggle for grip or not be able to take a corner. It’s like your grandmother, you always feel safe when you’re with her, you’re always smiling, and you know what to expect. But if the Porsche is your grandmother, than the M3 is your crazy uncle that you only see once every two months. The Bimmer is constantly on the edge, it’s loud, it’s scary, and it pushes you to your limits as a driver. It’s fast, it’s skittish, it’s freaking amazing. Unlike the Porsche’s docile nature, the M3 is ready to bite your head off at any moment. Driving the M3 is like putting your foot on a tiger’s neck, one mistake, and you’re toast. Again though, it’s all about personal preference, someone like my dad-and Happy Father’s Day to all the great dads out there-would likely prefer cruising the Malibu canyons with the top down, listening to the Boxster’s iconic howl. But if you ask me, I would definitely take that amazing M3.

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As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Electrification: The Next Chapter of the Porsche 718

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Photo Credit: HERE

The Porsche Boxster and Cayman (now 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman) are cars of controversy. Some say they are too slow, others say they’re just right. Some love the styling, others think they look like constipated lady bugs-yes, I’ve heard that before. Regardless of our opinions though, there is no denying that Porsche’s famous mid engined lineup is at a very awkward, yet revolutionary time in its history.

Rather symbolically, this new chapter in the 718s’ story started when Porsche renamed its Boxster and Cayman to the 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman referencing Porsche’s historical 718 racecar. In 2016, the Boxster and Cayman not only lost their names, they lost something more important, their lovely flat 6 engines. Gone were those iconic howling engines, replaced by something that looked like it came straight out of a Subaru. The naturally aspirated flat 6s were thrown out and replaced with smaller, turbocharged flat 4s.

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Photo Credit: HERE

The problem with these new cars wasn’t their performance. These new 718s were objectively better than their predecessors. So much so in fact, that I remember wanting to race a 718 Boxster GTS on the freeway in my 997 911, but then realizing that it had 40 more hp. These new cars are FAST, but something is missing in them. Look at any review of the 718 Boxster or Cayman and they all talk about how there’s no zing, no emotion; it seems like the 718s are more McLaren than Porsche. This lack of emotion is directly linked to the fact that the new cars have 2 less cylinders, and in turn, a worse exhaust tone. The iconic howl of their famous flat 6 has been replaced with artificial burbles and the raspy, ugly tone of a 4 cylinder.

If there is one thing that the Porsche 718s have taught us it’s just how crucial a car’s exhaust note is. A simple change in sound has ruined a good part of the experience in Porsche’s most fun to drive cars. But what do we do when there’s NO exhaust note, NO sound? Well, unfortunately rumor has it that we’re about to find out.

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Photo Credit: HERE

I say this because according to a new Autocar report, Porsche has already made the decision to electrify the next generation of 718 sports cars set to arrive in 2022. Apparently Porsche is already testing prototypes of these new, electrified 718s. On the bright side though, the combustion engine isn’t being completely cut out since hybrid variants of the 718 will also be offered and sold alongside the electric ones. The reason for this change: emissions standards.

My biggest concern with this new electric platform is surprisingly not the sound. Unless my prayers have been answered, the flat 6 engine that used to be in these cars is not coming back-with the exception of GT4 and Spyder models. It likely won’t come back even with a hybrid setup and I hope I am wrong about this. With sound out of the way, I think the biggest problem will be the handling of these new cars, their weight in particular. Boxsters and Caymans have always been lightweight cars; if my memory serves me correctly, I don’t think there’s been a Boxster of Cayman that’s weighed over 3000 lb (1361 kg). But just like the 911s, every succeeding generation of Boxsters/Caymans has been heavier than their predecessors. As we know, a low weight is the key to good handling and I’m concerned that this next generation’s famous handling will be spoiled by heavy batteries and electronics.

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Photo Credit: HERE

But who knows, maybe Porsche will use their sorcery to make the electric 718s handle like they are much lighter cars like they did with the 918 Spyder. One thing is clear: change is coming, and this change is clearly necessary to save the 718 lineup. And if push comes to shove, I’d rather have an electric Boxster than no Boxster.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

 

 

The Porsche Boxster: A Porsche for the Purists

What do YOU think about the Porsche Boxster?

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Photo Credit: HERE

The Porsche Boxster is a very interesting car to say the least, having a split perception in the eyes of the public. Some view it as its infamous nickname suggests, a “poor man’s Porsche,” while some view it as a fun driver’s car for the purists. The Boxster is also at a crucial chapter in its story right now. With Boxster and Cayman sales remaining dangerously low, Porsche has to decide what to do with its little two seat roadster and they seem to be open to any suggestions.

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Photo Credit: HERE

The story of our humble, little roadster started in the early 1990s, when Porsche was on the verge of bankruptcy. It was a scary time for Porsche to say the least. Sales were falling and Porsche’s front engined line up was beginning to show its age; they needed a new, affordable sports car, fast. Inspired by the early success and demand for the newly introduced Mazda Miata, Porsche began development of the Boxster immediately. The goal was to bring back the days of the legendary Porsche 550 Spyder, which meant Porsche’s new car had to be lightweight, mid-engined, and most importantly, a roadster.

A big problem at the time-and mostly why Porsche was going bankrupt-was Porsche’s inefficient production process at the time – I know, Germans being inefficient, shocking! This flawed formula was what caused Porsche’s costs to rise and their profits to drop; it was slow, expensive, and it had to go. To solve this problem Porsche hired ex-Toyota engineers to completely overhaul their production process. As a result, assembly time dropped from 120 hours to 72 while errors fell by 50%.

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This new method also led to the new 996 911 to be essentially co-developed with the “lesser” Boxster. But none the less, Porsche’s mid-engined savior did become a reality, having been unveiled in 1996, 4 years after the initial concept was shown in 1992.

My Boxster

The original Boxster, dubbed the 986 was not very well received by the purists despite it saving the Porsche brand. It was too ugly, too slow, and too cheap, at least, that’s what the purists thought hence its sub $10,000 asking prices today. I own a 1999 986 Boxster, and although it isn’t the fastest car I’ve driven, or the best looking, I find it very hard not to smile when driving up on a canyon road. I learned to love it even more when the top had a leak and I was “stuck” driving my dad’s 911 for the week. Don’t get me wrong, I LOVE that 911, it was the car that got me to love cars and I will treasure it forever, but on some of those canyon roads, it was just too fast. I didn’t have time to enjoy the breeze or the sound of the engine because all of a sudden, trees and cliffs were approaching me 3 times faster.

That week with the 911 really changed the way I looked at sports cars, especially my Boxster. I was one of those who hated the original Boxster, but after some time, I have learned to love the poor man’s Porsche.

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