Lotus Evija: The Future

@rsreportblog

Last Wednesday, we had the honor to visit Galpin’s Debut of the all new Lotus Evija, all thanks to David Gonzalez. A massive thank you to him for inviting us to this memorable event. This blog post will be a mixture of news and a hands on car review. So to the people who expected a Porsche post today, we’re sorry. This event was too important to pass.

The Lotus Evija is Lotus’ version of the rebirth of their company. Lotus is known for their renowned lightweight sports cars such as the Exige, Elise, and Evora. However, with this new Evija, Lotus is jumping headfirst into the Electric Hypercar market, going head to head with automakers like Rimac and Pininfarina, with the C_Two and Battista, respectively. The Lotus has significantly higher numbers. Is this the new Holy Trinity?

However, what makes this Lotus so special is it’s 4 engines producing a record breaking 2,000 horsepower. Keep in mind this car is going into production. The engines are supplied by a company many have heard of, Williams. They might be known more by their Formula 1 legacy, but they want to dive into the Formula E series because of obvious reasons (They’re failing in Formula 1). Developing a car with the same batteries helps the company test durability under extreme conditions. There are 4 motors, one powering each wheel.

The Aerodynamics of this car are like no other. This car even has DRS, borrowed from Formula 1, similar to Ferrari’s system on the LaFerrari. There is an active wing along a flap in the diffuser that raises and lowers depending on how much downforce is needed. There is a huge canal that reaches from the side of the car all the way to the rear for air to pass through. Anthony and I experimented with this canal and got some great photos.

Onto the interior. There is an unbelievable sense of simplicity while still being practical. The center console is perfectly laid out, with all the buttons on a seamless gloss black piece with an interesting pattern. The gauge cluster is one big hexagonal shaped screen. The steering wheel is reminiscent of those in Formula 1, being a small rectangular shape with many high quality components.

There is not a single piece of plastic in the interior. Absolutely everything is covered in Alcantara or carbon fiber. Did I mention there was no dashboard at all? The absence of mirrors is also noticeable. There are 3 very high definition screens showcasing what the conventional mirrors would, but with a better angle of view.

After experiencing all 3 of the Electric Hypercars, I would definitely take the Lotus Evija in a heartbeat. The design in the rear of the car is so unique, the numbers are insane, and it has been developed by a Formula 1 team. I am looking forward to seeing what these can do on the track and to see the reliability. Lotus took a jump, not a step, in the right direction, and I think we can all agree that they did a fantastic job.

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The Porsche 911 GT3 Turns 20

With the 996 GT3 introduced in 1999, 2019 marks the 20th anniversary of the GT3. If that black hunk of metal with a wing running round the Nurburgring means anything, we can expect the 992 GT3 to be released at this year’s Frankfurt Motorshow just in time for the 20th anniversary.

Photo credit here

The 996 generation wasn’t received too well by 911 enthusiasts. The new water cooled Mezger engine simply didn’t have the signature whirr of the belt driven fan of the air cooled engine. However, as many enthusiasts will tell you, the 996 GT3 has so many beautiful engine sounds that you’ll forget about what cools it. Despite base Carrera owners being unimpressed by their new 996s, GT3 owners were happy to report that it had great weight distribution and amazing throttle response due to the super light flighwheel. With max torque at 5,000 RPM, and max horsepower at 7,200 RPM, this new water cooled engine was definitely happier close to redline, which was almost 8,000 RPM.

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The 997 GT3 took the standard set by the 996 to an even higher level. An increase of .2 L brought the 997 to a 3.8L Flat 6 which now made 415 hp (435 hp for the 997.2 GT3), a huge jump compared to the 996’s 375 hp. With the updated design came a more modern nose an a much sharper rear, making the GT3 look as slick as it performed. The newly designed wing also looked much more efficient than the 996 generation. Also, the 997 GT3 was the first GT3 to have PASM, also known as Porsche Adjustable Suspension Management.

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Even though many praised the system, some enthusiasts were fearful that the 911 was creeping farther and farther from its roots since it now used an electronic suspension system. I have one thing to say to these people. Get with the times. If you want an air cooled 911 with ancient underpinnings then go ahead and buy a 930 or a 964. Porsche can’t stay behind the competition just to please the purists. And this is coming from a purist!

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The 991 GT3 still maintained it’s “GT3ness” despite major updates from the 997. Among other things, the new car came only with a PDK; the first GT3 with a dual clutch transmission. It also had rear wheel steering, making it the ultimate track toy anyone could ask for. The 991.1 had a 3.8L 475 horsepower Flat 6 but the face lifted 991.2 brought it home with a 4.0L Flat 6 making a clean 500 horsepower. The facelift brought back a manual option at no extra cost! The touring package was first offered on the 991.2 which removed the rear wing to give the GT3 a more subtle look. You can read our review of the 991 GT3 here. It’s truly the perfect balance of both track and road use. That flat 6 makes heavenly noises all throughout the rpm spectrum.

As the 992 GT3 roams around the Nürburgring, we can only wonder what Porsche has in store for us. Will there be a hybrid system? Will it have active aero? Will it be lighter and more hardcore? We can only wonder. One thing is for sure though. The GT3’s legacy will live on for many years to come!

Photo credit here

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The Porsche 911 GT3: The Ultimate Canyon Carver

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475 horsepower. 324 lb/ft of torque. 3.8 liter Flat 6. By today’s standards, this just seems like your average sports car. However, when you take the 9,000 rpm redline and the 3, 267 lb curb weight into consideration, nothing matches the GT3. With turbocharging taking over the works of Ferrari and McLaren, the GT3 is one of the most pure canyon carvers money can buy. I would like to thank @z_kirovakan for putting that money to good use and allowing me to carve the hills of Malibu alongside him.

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The GT3 is not the most hardcore nor the most powerful Porsche on sale, but I will argue that it is the most perfect canyon carver. With the Sharkwerks exhaust fitted on this GT3, the exhaust note echoes off of the canyon walls and fills your ears with joy. Nothing matches the noise this car makes all the way from idle to 9,000 rpm. This was my first time experiencing a PDK transmission and it really is from the future. The shifts are almost nonexistent. We held a race with an Aventador SV (video on @rsreportblog) and you can see how much of a difference the PDK makes compared to the SV’s single clutch. Even though the Porsche has a power deficit of 250 horsepower, the weight and the shifts definitely make up for the GT3’s disadvantage.

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Speaking of PDK, this was also my first time experiencing launch control. Porsche’s launch control is unique, because most supercars launch from 3-4,000 rpm. On the GT3 however, the savage launch only begins at 7,000 rpm. Keep in mind that the redline is 9,000 rpm. As we launched, my head was thrown back at who knows how many Gs and I was genuinely scared for my life. Roller coasters can’t even compare. After the launch flew through the tunnels, with the sharkwerks exhaust echoing off the walls and the PDK shifting with a blink of an eye.

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Compared to the 950 horsepower, 900 lb/ft torque Turbo S, this car feels like a different beast to conquer. In the straights, the Turbo S leaves this car in the dust. However, in the canyons the Turbo S feels like just another grand tourer you can take on long drives. The GT3 was definitely fast in the straights, but in the canyons, the car truly felt like it was home. After nearly an hour of canyon carving, I started feeling nauseous due to the amount of Gs this car is able to pull in the corners. It really can’t be compared to a Turbo S in my opinion.

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Since this car handles so well in the canyons, how does it compare on the streets of Beverly Hills? Surprisingly, I genuinely felt more comfortable in the GT3 than Anthony’s 997 Carrera. The ride is very adaptable in the GT3, since the Porsche Sport Mode can be activated and deactivated depending on your driving style.

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Before I had the privilege to ride in this GT3, and you asked me what car I would take to canyon carve, I would’ve said a gated 6 speed Ferrari F430 Spider in a heartbeat. After this mind blowing experience though, my heart has turned to another car. The Porsche 911 GT3.

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I would like to thank @z_kirovakan again for his generosity and the privilege of letting me ride in his GT3. Also, thank you to @50K2LA for organizing one of the best private rallies I’ve attended and thank you for inviting us. Truly one of the best experiences of my life. Cheers to future events! Make sure to see all the videos of this experience on our instagram: @rsreportblog.
As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The 718s Have Been Cured: The New 718 GT4 and Spyder

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Photo Credit: HERE

When the 718 twins were first revealed, Porsche was faced with hard criticism on the new 2.0L Turbocharged Flat 4 they put in place of the signature Flat 6. To place a bigger margin between the Boxster/Cayman and the 911, Porsche decided to “ruin” their mid engined sports car, according to enthusiasts. However, now these enthusiasts can rejoice! With the reveal of the new 718 Cayman GT4 and 718 Boxster Spyder, Porsche announced that these 2 hardcore versions of the 718 twins would have the 4.0L Flat 6 with 414 horsepower and 309 lb/ft of torque. The GT4 hits 189 mph while the Spyder “only” tops out at 187 mph.

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Photo Credit: HERE

The 4.0L Flat 6 might throw some enthusiasts off, since the 911 GT3 has the same displacement. Porsche actually bored out an extra liter from the Carrera S engine and removed the turbos. However, the new 718 twins boast an extra 29 horsepower over the previous generation 981 twins. The party piece of this new engine though is its 8,000 RPM redline. It’s an increase of 200 RPM over their predecessors, but reactions from enthusiasts show that it’s a significant difference.

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Photo Credit: HERE

The task for Porsche to achieve all of this wasn’t an easy one. In order to make these range topping 718s significantly better performing than their predecessors, Porsche made many changes to the Carrera S engine. Other than the fact that the turbos were removed from the engine and it was bored out by a liter, Porsche upgraded to forged pistons and a forged crankshaft. But the list doesn’t end there. The new 718s have an aluminum intake system, piezo fuel injectors, and a dry-sump oil system with a high performance oil pump.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Now, onto the handling aspect of the range topping 718s. Just like the previous GT4/Boxster, the new 718s share their front axle and brakes with the 911 GT3. The rear axle was made specifically for the GT4 and Spyder. It has a mechanical differential and PTV, also known as Porsche’s Torque Vectoring system. The 718s have PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management) and a ride height that has been reduced by 1.2 inches over the standard 718s. With these suspension tweaks comes infinitely adjustable settings for camber, toe, ride height, and anti-roll bar stiffness.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Continuing the handling theme, the new 718 GT4 has increased performance when it comes to downforce. It produces 50% more downforce than its predecessor. Although they might look similar on the outside, the new Cayman GT4 boasts a single chamber arch rear silencer leading to some real estate for a rear diffuser. The fixed rear wing, front splitter, and air curtains add 52.8 pounds of extra downforce over the previous generation GT4.

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Photo Credit: HERE

The Clubsport package is a whole different story. It turns the GT4 into a bare bones racecar ready for the track. It comes with a fire extinguisher, and a 6 point racing harness. Interestingly, it also comes with a steel roll bar, that can’t be fitted in the US due to regulations. Apparently, the US is afraid of you hitting your head on the roll bar so they banned it. In the case of the car rolling over, you can be relieved that your head won’t hit the roll bar, so the metal roof can comfort the hit instead.

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Photo Credit: HERE

The 718 Boxster Spyder is essentially a smaller version of the 911 Speedster. It replicates the double humps on the Speedster and also has an active wing. Along with the wing, the Spyder has a functional diffuser to provide downforce. The previous generation had an automatically folding roof, but with the new 718 Spyder, Porsche utilized a manually folding roof to save weight, similar to the Speedster. It is the first Boxster to ever produce downforce on the rear axle.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Of course with all of these upgrades, there is a price premium over the base 718. The Spyder costs $97,550 and the GT4 costs $100,450. The base 718 Boxster costs $59,000 and the 718 Cayman costs $56,900 so that bears the question, is it worth it? However, these models aren’t going to be limited production cars, in order to keep buyers from flipping their cars.

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Photo Credit: HERE

I interviewed Boxster and Cayman owners to hear their thoughts on the new Spyder and GT4. First off is Jennifer (@jennetic and @9.ate.7), a 987 Boxster owner. She said, “I just think that, you know it’s only plus over the old one is 1k in the RPM, it’s still 1k shy of what a real 4.0L should make. A 718 GTS shares pretty much the same numbers and the supra is faster and also 50k less. Just doesn’t convince me, it’s all a false promise of a better car.”

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David (@siramg_), a 718 Boxster owner, also had something to say. “I think we are in an extreme transitional period when it comes to cars. Moving away from N/A motors and majority of our favorite sports cars now having forced induction. While I see why we are now in forced induction era with all the benefits from efficiency, smaller displacement backing so much power, emissions, and so on. Porsche was always known for their high revving flat six power plants. When the current generation of the 718 was introduced to the public there was massive love/hate for it. While it had massive amounts of low end torque unlike its predecessor in my opinion it lacked what true Porsche cars were known for. That screaming high pitch of the flat six, you no longer needed to really rev the car out to hit the power band. But it feels awkward at times when you get on the pedal and behind you you’re hearing turbo spool and preprogrammed pops. It you come to love and appreciate the 718 for what it now is. The GT4 and Spyder were a true gift from Porsche for the true purists. For those that truly loved Porsche for what it really is an extremely driver focused raw sports car. And for that it makes them even more special. Manuals are dying out, N/A is a thing of the past. But to have it once more… wow the car gods have answered our prayers. We have Porsche to thank for that.”

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Anthony Petrossian, the co owner of RS Report owns a 986 Boxster. He said, “As Porsche said, the new GT4 and Spyder are perfectly irrational. We could have gotten more power with turbos and a faster lap time with a PDK, but it’s not about that. These cars are about the drive, they’re about that magical feeling that lap times and 0-60 times can’t measure. We need that now more than ever.”

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Photo Credit: HERE

With that, please leave a comment with your thoughts on the new 718 Spyder and GT4. As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Passing the Torch: The New 992 Porsche 911 Targa

992 Targa Cover
Photo Credit: HERE

With the future models of 992 coming at us from every direction, the new Targa has been the only one viewed with no camouflage, indicating that it will likely be the next 992 to be officially revealed. The incoming GT3 and Turbo have both been out and about but the Targa has been running round the Nurburgring in a bright red color grabbing the attention of photographers camped out at the ‘ring.

Old Targa Back
Photo Credit: HERE

The only reason there even is a new Targa is because of its rich history. In 1973, Porsche was looking for ways to produce a convertible car that had structural rigidity in order to comply with the fickle American regulations for selling a convertible car on American soil. Porsche eagerly jumped to find a conclusion since the American market for convertibles was so massive. Eventually, the solution to their problem came to them in the form of the famous silver roll bar seen on early targa models. Zuffenhausen’s engineers learned that putting this roll bar in place of the B pillar would provide the required amount of rigidity while still being able to remove a section of the roof-the car was still a convertible. Porsche named this special 911 the “Targa” to celebrate their success in the Targa Florio race where driver Gijs van Lennep won the race in his Porsche 911 Carrera RSR. Yet another Porsche named after racing.

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Photo Credit: HERE

However, Targas didn’t always have the roll bar we see today. The 993 and 996 generations had a Panoramic roof that stretched from the windshield all the way to the trunk. The 997 generation also had the panoramic roof but it was only available in the 4 and 4S trim levels.

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Photo Credit: HERE

For the 991 generation, Porsche only offered the Targa on AWD trim models yet again but they also took the Targa back to its roots by bringing back the classic brushed aluminum roll bar and 3 gills. To cope with the times this new Targa had an automatic folding roof, with the rear glass window moving all the way up allowing the cloth to automatically fold behind the seats.

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Photo Credit: HERE

That brings us back to the 992 Targa. Recently spotted at the Nurburgring, it is seen sporting the same brushed aluminum roll bar and gills as the 991 and is keeping the Targa tradition alive. However, one question remains. The Targa has always been heavier than the cabriolet, so will Porsche bring back the RWD Targa to save weight for the 992 generation? Only time will tell… Tell us what you think in the comments!

992 Targa Side
Photo Credit: HERE

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Hypercar Level Performance: The Gemballa Turbo S

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I would like to begin by thanking Cody (@cody23m) for providing his 911 Turbo S to support RS Report. When I received an invite to a prestige event called Cars and Jets, I scrambled to get a ride from supercar owners everywhere in SoCal. Cars and Jets is the only private super and hyper car show in the world. In the words of the founder, Steven Barth, “This event sets itself apart from the countless others by going back to the roots when owners got together and shared the passion for cars without having to deal with countless photographers, police, angry neighbors, and people looking for business opportunities when we just want to enjoy a Sunday with friends. Making owners and their personal guests the only attending creates a relaxing atmosphere that leads to great conversation and friendships. In the end that’s what makes the car scene the most fun.”

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I humbly asked Cody if he would like to attend with his monster of a 911. May 11th was the best day of my life. Before the event, our crew met up in front of my house. When Cody pulled up, I ran outside to greet him and was confronted by, essentially, the German Batmobile. The bolt on wheel arches, the massive wing, the beautiful 3 piece Gemballa wheels, and the exposed carbon fiber engine vents just added to the overall effect of the car. Gemballa wasn’t messing around when it designed this masterpiece.

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As I climbed into the Gemballa Turbo S, nothing seemed out of the ordinary. It had a gorgeous red leather interior and even heated seats. It was like climbing into a comfortable bed that was conveniently placed on top a 950 horsepower, 900 lb/ft of torque monster. By Design extracted these hypercar level numbers on a low tune. That’s right, this thing can be cranked up even higher. There’s a methanol injection kit that converts 91 octane into 95 octane, but the car can run race gas if need be. The full spec sheet will be at the bottom of the article.
The startup was quiet, due to those massive turbos sucking in all of the glorious noises that flat 6 could’ve produced [Insert Anthony’s GT3RS article here].

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As we pulled onto the main road, I still couldn’t find the difference between Anthony’s 997 911 and this Turbo S. It wasn’t until Cody smashed that gas pedal all the way into the floor that I felt like I was either going to throw up, pass out, or die. I do have a phobia of roller coasters, and this car should’ve had a big fat warning label on the dashboard. I clutched my stomach as the view became blurrier and blurrier, and finally, a godsend. There was a red light. I couldn’t have imagined this car would accelerate that fast. I was at a loss for words, they couldn’t even begin to describe the magnitude of acceleration that this car can achieve.

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As we drove closer to the event, our crew encountered an insanely loud Gallardo Superleggera, which attempted to overtake us. Now, Gallardo Superleggeras are nothing to be joked about, but with one magical downshift, we accelerated to his overtaking speed in less than a second. Literally. As I tried to take out my phone to film, we encountered a stop sign, which approached us much, much faster than I could perceive. Now, this meant braking. Hard, hard braking. Never have I felt that many G forces pull on my body; If I didn’t have a seatbelt on, I would’ve undoubtedly flew out of the windshield. I felt my face begin to pull off in ways I’ve never felt before.

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During the rally through Angeles Crest, the car still took corners flawlessly. This car might be extremely fast in a straight line, but it is still a 911, corners are its middle name. As we pulled to the side to regroup, people approached us excitedly to tell us that the Turbo S was shooting flames. That’s the least to be expected when Gemballa and By Design get their hands on a car. Those Turbos have to breathe somehow right?

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What I experienced in this Gemballa Turbo S could be considered torture to some people, but I enjoyed every single second spent in that car, it was truly mind blowing. Thanks again to Cars and Jets for organizing this event and Cody for generously taking me to this event. This was truly the best day of my life by far, and I owe it all to them.
Here is the spec list:

991 Turbo S Spec List

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Why was the Porsche 911 Designed with a Rear Engine, Rear Wheel Drive Layout?

Old and New 911
Photo Credit: HERE

Have you ever heard of a sports car with an engine behind the rear axle? Immediately, the Porsche 911 comes to mind. I can’t think of another sports car with this layout off the top of my head. This iconic design has been a staple of the 911, since 1963. But what was the reason for this design?

Old and New 911 Side
Photo Credit: HERE

The reasoning was simple, Porsche believed it was the most practical way to build a sports car since a mid engined layout wasn’t suitable for having rear passengers or effective noise cancellation in the cabin. Vibrations from the engine would have been easily felt by all unfortunate enough to be inside the car.

Old and New 911 Diagonal
Photo Credit: HERE

By placing the Flat 6 behind the rear axles, there would be space for 2 small* rear passengers and luggage could fit in the large front trunk. Noise isolation and vibrations were easier to control by having the engine placed farther away from the cabin. Most importantly, traction was proven to be better than any other layout, because the weight of the engine on the rear axles helped the wheels keep steady contact with the road, hence why 911s are so quick off the line.

996 and 993
Photo Credit: HERE

However, 911 enthusiasts are very strict with what defines a “pure” 911. For example, when Porsche made the 996 water cooled unlike all previous air cooled 911s, people considered it to be the death of the 911 and don’t get me started on those fried egg headlights. Pricing of the 993 is continuing to skyrocket while the 996 might as well be the cheapest 911 money can buy, which is likely why the rear engine will stay with the 911 for the rest of its life.

991 GT2RS RS Report
Owner: @gt2urbo 

This seemingly unbalanced rear engine design has also been proven performance-wise with cars like the new 911 GT2RS setting lap records left and right; Porsche has shown that this odd layout can definitely compete with mid engined supercars. After 56 years of constant tweaking and evolution, Porsche has clearly perfected its signature rear engine, rear wheel drive design.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!