The 5 Most Expensive Porsches Ever Made

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Photo Credit: HERE

Anyone who is into cars can tell you that it is by no means a cheap hobby. Over time cars have gotten more and more expensive, and so have parts. This is all while the actual value of the car continues to depreciate. But, there are those rare instances where the value of a car actually appreciates over time. The two most notable brands when it comes to appreciation are Ferrari and Porsche. Although Ferrari easily takes the victory in terms of appreciation (the most expensive car ever sold at auction was a Ferrari 250 GTO which sold for $48.4 million) Porsche has some ultra rare, valuable cars of its own. Here are the 5 most expensive Porsches ever sold at auction.

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Number 5: The Porsche 917/30 Spyder

The Porsche 917 needs no introduction. It is one of the most successful racecars ever made winning races in all sorts of classes. Of all the 917 variants, the 917/30t Spyder was the craziest one by far. The 917/30 was built in the early 1970s to compete in the North American Can-Am Racing Series, which it dominated. Part of the reason why it was so good was its other worldly powerplant. The 917/30 remains one of the most powerful racecars ever built making around 1500hp from its 5.4 liter twin turbo flat 12 which propelled the car to 60 mph in just 2.1 seconds and onto a top speed of 227 mph. Keep in mind though, that this was an old school turbo engine, meaning the car was overrun with turbo lag. This and the fact that there was over 400 liters of fuel on board made the 917/30 Spyder one of the scariest racecars to drive. Chassis No. 4 was recently sold for $3,000,000 at auction.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Number 4: The Porsche 550 A Spyder

Among other things, the Porsche 550 was Porsche’s first ever purpose built racing car, and boy was it special. This car was nicknamed “The Giant Killer” because it completely walked its competition with about 1/3 of the horsepower. The 550 was powered by a 1.5 liter air cooled flat 4 which made around 135 horsepower, so powerful I know. But what the 550 lacked in power, it made up for in handling 10 fold. This car was much lighter and more agile than its competition. So much so, that it won races like the 1956 Targa Florio and the 1953 24 Hours of Le Mans with ease. This car has built such a great legacy, that one (Chassis No. 145) was sold recently at auction for a staggering $5,170,000.

 

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Photo Credit: HERE

Number 3: The Porsche 911 GT1 Strassenversion

The 911 GT1 Strassenversion (meaning street version) was Porsche’s homlogation special for its legendary GT1 racecar. (Click here to read all about the legend that was the 911 GT1) Limited to just 20 units, the GT1 Strassenversion was built for the sole purpose of Porsche being able to meet requirements to race their GT1. Just by looking at it, you can tell that the GT1 is something special. With its radical design, mid engined layout, and more wings and scoops than you can count, you know it means business. Under the hood though was even more special since the GT1 came powered by a slightly detuned version of the racecar’s 3.6 liter twin turbo flat 6 designed by the legendary Hans Mezger. In fact, this engine was basis for the famous “Mezger engine” that powered the 996 and 997 911 Turbos and GT cars. In the Strassenversion, this engine made 536 hp and 450 lb/ft of torque which propelled the car to 60 mph in just 3.9 seconds all the way to a top speed of 191 mph. A GT1 Strassenversion recently sold at auction for $5,665,000.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Number 2: The Porsche 956

Like the 917, the Porsche 956 was known for its dominance in motorsport. The 956’s specialty was 1980s Group C racing, you can imagine how that went. The 956 was powered by a 2.65 liter twin turbo flat 6 that made around 635 hp which could take the 956 all the way to speeds of around 227 mph without breaking a sweat. More importantly though, the 956 was one of the first racecars to feature “Ground Effect” Styling which meant that the car’s body was designed in a specific way to maximize downforce. The 956 took aerodynamics very seriously and won a lot of races as a result. It also set the overall Nurburgring lap record at 6 minutes and 11.13 seconds; this record was held for 35 years until being beaten by Porsche’s own 919 Evo. The most famous of the 956 fleet though was Chassis No. 3 which won many races including the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Chassis No. 3 is widely considered to be one of the most successful racecars ever and it fetched a whopping $10,120,000 at auction.

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Number 1: The Porsche 917K

If there is one car that sums up Porsche’s racing history, it’s the 917, the most popular of which is the 917K. For those that don’t know, the 917 was the car that gave Porsche its first overall win at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1970. The 917 came powered by Porsche’s legendary flat 12 engine developed by none other than Hans Mezger. In it’s most powerful configuration, the engine was 5.0 Liters and produced a maximum of 630 hp. The 917 also pioneered “Ground Effect” Styling which made the car very stable, stable enough to take the Mulsanne Straight at speeds in excess of 220 mph. In fact, drivers even reported being able to take their hands off the steering wheel at speeds of over 240 mph, that’s how stable it was. Along with its incredible speed and handling, the 917 was also one of the best (in my opinion, THE best) sounding Porsche ever made. Steve McQueen’s 917 from the movie, Le Mans, broke the record for the most expensive Porsche ever sold, selling at $14,080,000, the best for last.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

The 997.2 911 GT3RS: Analog Perfection

@lennsport

Before I start, I would first like to thank @lennsport for taking the time out his busy day to make this review possible. He is a true car enthusiast and just a great guy to be around. This wouldn’t have been possible without him.

As time has progressed, so have cars. Cars today are in every way faster and more efficient than they were 10, 20, and 30 years ago. With fancy turbocharged engines, lightning fast dual clutch transmissions, crazy suspension, and carbon ceramic brakes the size of my boxster’s wheels, it’s no surprise at all. But notice how I said “faster” instead of “better.” This is because as we have seen, faster, does not necessarily mean better. I am a firm believer that there is such thing as too much horsepower when it comes to how fun a car is. That is why I firmly believe that the 997.2 GT3RS is the best driver’s car money can buy, period.

Don’t get me wrong, the new GT3RS is a phenomenal car (if you don’t believe me click on this sentence to see our review of one) but it is nothing compared to the 997.2 in terms of driving pleasure.Let me explain.

@lennsport

The Looks and Interior

Looks are subjective, I’ll agree to that. Some people don’t like the look of Porsche’s GT cars with their flared wheel arches and monstrous wings, heck, some people don’t like the look of the Porsche 911 as a whole; I am not one of those people. In my humble opinion, the 997.2 generation is the best looking 911 out there. It has perfect proportions, subtle yet noticable lines, and those perfect tail lights. Combine this subtle, yet special body with the wing and flares of a GT3RS and you get pure perfection, I mean just look at it. It’s not wide like a 4 lane freeway, but it’s not a motorcycle either. If there is a “Goldilocks 911,” this is it. Also it’s the only car in the history of mankind to look good in red wheels which is a plus in my book.

The interior is probably the least special thing about this car and that’s saying something. It’s just as refined and high quality as any 997 with touches of red alcantara and fabric door pulls to make you feel a little special. The seats though are something else. Those buckets are straight out of a racecar and they hold you in like one; they are not for people with back pain.

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The Acceleration

Thanks to you guys, I’ve been lucky enough to experience a variety of supercars and sports cars in my life with the 997.2 GT3RS being one of them. And if you’re all about specs and 0-60 times, I’m afraid you’ll be disappointed, this is not the car for you. With 450hp coming out of its 3.8 liter flat 6 and a 3,020 lb curb weight, the 997.2 GT3RS is no slouch, but it’s not at the level of today’s supercars, and quite frankly, I don’t really care. After driving a Ferrari 458, I learned what it means to have too much power. The GT3RS is riding this fine line where it’s blisteringly fast, but not too fast to be unusable. Also, one thing that I noticed was just how linear the power delivery was. They weren’t lying when they said they’d put a racing engine in the GT3RS, that Mezger motor is true to a racecar, much more so than the engine of a 991 GT3RS.

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The Sound

Speaking of that glorious Mezger flat 6, one thing that makes the GT3RS so enjoyable is its sound. In a world of muffled, turbocharged, souless, engines, the song of the 997.2 GT3RS is a true gem. The sound is just so raw and unfiltered, it makes the new GT3RS sound like a Tesla. As you climb through the revs (and oh does this engine like to rev), the hairs on the back of your neck stand up as you hear the cams, valves, and exhaust all working in perfect unison up to its 8400 rpm redline. Even at startup and idle, it sounds special with its vibrating flywheel making it sound like a cammed V8 at idle. Long story short, the 997.2 GT3RS is loud and proud, with no compromises what so ever.

@lennsport

The Way It Drives

Everything I’ve mentioned so far: racecar looks, the racecar seats, the racecar engine, and the racecar sound lead up to the 997.2 GT3RS being one of the best, if not the best driving cars ever made. This is largely in part because everything is connected together by a perfect, 997 era 6 speed manual transmission complete with a factory short shifter and tightened gear ratios. The manual is what really brings this car together, and it’s what sets it apart from the competition. Combine this beautiful setup with perfect hydraulic steering feel and some racecar suspension as a nice little cherry on top and you get the 997.2 GT3RS. You know it’s special just by looking at it and after one mash of the throttle pedal, you know you’re in for a treat. The car just grips and grips and grips, just like the new GT3RS’ of today. That suspension gives you a tough time on the street but when you’re going fast, that equates for ZERO body roll. This thing truly corners like it’s on rails. I said before that this car’s acceleration makes it feel outdated, but that is NOT the case with the handling, if anything, it feels much faster than any new supercar.

The Verdict

Going in to this review, I thought the 997.2 GT3RS would feel like a more powerful and slightly sharper version of my 997.1 Carrera. I didn’t think for a second it would be on par with the new supercars of today. Thankfully, I was wrong, this is in every way, a tried and true supercar (scratch that, racecar, this is a racecar). And after reviewing it, I know why they’ve become so expensive. There simply is nothing like it on the road today, and there probably never will be ever again. The 997.2 GT3RS was the last supercar of the Golden Age.

Do you have a cool car for us to review? If so, please feel free to contact us via Instagram @rsreportblog. Thank you!

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

UPDATE: The Manual 992 is Finally Here!

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For those of you that read last week’s article, first of all, thank you so much. Second of all, I’ll admit that we ended on a rather sad note because it seemed like Porsche had given up on a manual transmission for the 992 Carrera models. There had been no news and no test cars and it was becoming time to assume the worst. Thankfully though, I was wrong because about two days after last week’s article was published, Porsche proudly unveiled the manual transmission as a no cost option for the 992 Carrera S and 4S. The manual for the Carrera and Carrera 4 models will be revealed later (likely at this year’s LA Auto Show).

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Photo Credit: HERE

Like from the last 2 generations, the manual transmission in the 992 will be a 7 speed unit-basically a 6 speed with a highway cruising gear. Luckily for the purists, the manual comes as a no cost option and will save you approximately 84 pounds over the standard 8 speed PDK transmission. And for the first time, Porsche will even throw in the Sport Chrono Package free of charge if you select the manual. This option in my opinion is crucial to getting the most fun out of your 911. In the manual 992, it gives you a drive mode select switch, PSM Sport Mode, Automatic Rev matching (you don’t need that), and Porsche Active driveline mounts. More importantly, this would cost an additional $2,720 if it was on a PDK car. Manual equipped cars will also come equipped with mechanical limited slip differentials, unlike the electronic LSD that’s mated to the PDK transmission.

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Photo Credit: HERE

So far, the only performance figures we have for the manual 992s are that they both have the same top speeds as their PDK equipped counterparts (191 mph for the Carrera S and 190 mph for the Carrera 4S). Obviously, 0-60 times will be slower for the manual cars but with some power shifting lessons, I’m sure a skilled driver can keep the times within the mid 3 seconds rather than the low 4s.

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Photo Credit: HERE

So yes, the PDK is faster in every single way possible. It’s also easier to drive, and more fuel efficient. But honestly who cares? A Porsche 911 is a sports car, built for tearing up back roads and racetracks on early Sunday mornings. Your 911 shouldn’t be your daily driver that you lug to work every day, and if it is, I’m sorry to say, but you need a different car. I actually daily drove my 997 911 for about a month and it was awful. The ride was too harsh, the clutch was too heavy, and it drank gas like there was no tomorrow. These cars aren’t built for sitting in traffic jams, if you don’t believe me, drive a 911 below 10 mph, you’ll see what I mean. And there’s no denying that in a car like a Carrera S, whose speed is very accessible and not overwhelming, a manual is by all means, the more fun car to drive. That’s what it’s all about, so thank you Porsche for keeping the manual alive.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Where is the Manual 992?

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Photo Credit: HERE

It’s been almost a year since the 992 generation 911 was unveiled to the world at the LA Auto Show. In that year, the 992 911 has clearly established itself as a car worthy of the 911 badge. Journalist after journalist has raved about the 992’s distinct, 911 style driving feel despite its increased focus on luxury. The 992 is in every way a true 911 so that’s good, but there’s still a lot more to come.

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Photo Credit: HERE

In the year where we’ve had the 992, not much has actually happened in terms of new info. The only models out right now are the Carrera, Carrera 4, Carrera S, and Carrera 4S along with their cabriolet counterparts. Compared to the 30+ variants that were offered for the 991 generation 911, the 992 seems to be falling short, not that it’s a bad thing. But anyway, the 992 clearly has a long way to go and judging by the undisguised 992 Turbos, targas, GT3s, and GTSs, that have been seen testing out on the track, Porsche is clearly up to something. But despite the non-stop onslaught of 992 variants, there seems to be a lack of manual 992s. The only 992s that have been seen recently with a manual have been the GT3 prototypes, but what about the Carrera models already on sale?

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Photo Credit: HERE

For those that don’t know, the 992 was revealed at the 2018 LA Autoshow in the form of the Carrera S and 4S, each solely equipped with Porsche’s new 8 speed PDK transmission. When I was at the event, I noticed the lack of a manual transmission and fearing the worst, I asked about its absence , and was reassured that it would become available next year. Well, we’re about 82% through with 2019 and we’ve yet to see a 992 Carrera with a manual transmission. I don’t know about you but this is pretty alarming.

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Photo Credit: HERE

The manual transmission has always been a staple of a true Porsche. It is what truly connects the driver to the car. The feeling of rowing your own gears through a twisty canyon road is what Porsche has always been about. I understand that the PDK is faster and still fun to drive-trust me, I’ve driven one-but nothing compares to the driving feel of a manual transmission. And it’s not like we’ve never seen a prototype either. Long before the 992 was revealed, an image surfaced of a disguised prototype with, you guessed it, a proper manual gearbox. So has Porsche really given up on the manual for its base model cars? We already lost the NA engine, and I certainly hope we don’t lose the manual transmission. Let’s hope that the upcoming LA Auto Show will clear some things up for us.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

 

The Porsche Taycan 4S: Porsche’s “Entry Level” Taycan Has Arrived

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Photo Credit: HERE

When it comes to revealing new cars or new models, the traditional way was to reveal the lower trims first, and then work your way up. Ferrari, Lamborghini, McLaren, Porsche, and even Honda have adopted this standard. But since the Porsche Taycan is anything but the current precedent, I guess Porsche figured that they should unveil its different trims the complete opposite of how it’s been done for years. Case-in-point, they just unveiled the brand new Taycan 4S, one of their “entry level” Taycans.

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First and foremost, the naming makes sense this time, unlike the more expensive Taycan Turbo. Taycan is the name of the model, the 4 means 4 wheel drive (which it has) and the S meaning that this is the “Sport” version, indicating that there is still more to come. The pricing of the new Taycan 4S also makes sense; it starts at a relatively affordable $103,800. This price however, means nothing since with all the options selected, the Taycan 4S will run you close to $200,000. Even with no options, our entry level Taycan is still miles more expensive than the Tesla Model S, but then again, you get what you pay for.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Despite the Taycan 4S being the “entry level” model thus far, it is by no means a slouch. With the standard performance battery equipped, the Taycan 4S can make up to 522 hp and sprint to 60 mph in just 3.8 seconds. Keep in mind the 911 GT3 with its 500 hp, 9,000 rpm screaming flat 6 makes just 500 hp and sprints to 60 mph in 3.8 seconds with a manual transmission equipped. If you were to opt for the performance battery though, power would jump to 562 hp and the 0-60 time would drop to 3.6 seconds, not bad for the entry level car.

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Photo Credit: HERE

Now a big problem with the more expensive Taycan Turbo and Turbo S models was the range. The Taycan was built to be a road car, not a racecar thus, the car’s range would be a significant figure. Unfortunately, the Turbo and Turbo S lacked dominance when it came to range. The Taycan 4S’ 288 mile range trumps the 256 mile range of the Turbo and the 280 mile range of the Turbo S. Keep in mind though that these numbers are using the WLTP standard. The EPA has yet to release official range figures. None the less, the Taycan 4S has the range Porsche has been promising.

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Aside from these, a slightly smaller drivetrain, different wheels, and a little less leather, there really isn’t much to separate the Taycan 4S from its more powerful siblings. This begs the question, is an extra 200 hp on your daily driver worth paying $90,000 more for the Turbo S? If it were up to me, I’d take the 4S and save the $90,000 for a used GT3, but to each their own. You really won’t be disappointed either way.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

 

The All-Electric Macan Is Coming in Hot

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Photo Credit: HERE

Numbers are everything, period. They determine what we do, how we feel, how we act. They explain the world around us and provide the key to unlock the future. And there are an infinite amount of numbers, literally, yet today’s car scene seems to be obsessed with the number 7. It seems that every day now, supercars are setting sub 7 minute Nurburgring laps with 700+ hp cars. Heck, even a Jeep Grand Cherokee has 700+ hp. Being a leader in the performance car world, its no surprise that Porsche has adopted the 700 hp gold standard. The fastest 911, Cayenne, Taycan, and Panamera all have around 700 hp. And recent news suggests that the Macan will soon be joining the 700 hp club.

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Photo Credit: HERE

The Porsche Taycan changed the brand forever, there’s no doubting that. With the Taycan came the development of Porsche’s J1 platform, which is where our story begins today. Now, it’s no secret that Porsche was planning on electrifying their baby SUV, the Macan, in the near future. The only problem was that Porsche didn’t really have a platform to accommodate the heavy batteries that power EVs. That was until the Taycan arrived with its J1 platform. From the J1 platform, Volkswagen derived its new PPE (Premium Platform Electric) Platform which the new Macan EV will be based on.

The target date is around 2021, and initially, the Macan EV will be sold alongside its gas powered brother although it will sport a radically different design so we can easily differentiate the two. Now I know what you’re thinking-and I thought the same thing when I first heard of this-,”Who cares about the Macan?” Porsche enthusiasts-at least the ones reading this-care about sports cars, emotion, and horsepower; a new electric SUV is literally the opposite of those 3. I admit, at first glance, this does kind of look bad. But remember Porsche’s obsession with the number 7? Well what if I told you that this new electric Macan will be making up to 700 hp and not just any horsepower, 700 instant, electric horsepower with electric all wheel drive. Now that’s a Porsche.

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Photo Credit: HERE

That’s right, the upcoming electric Macan Turbo and Tubro S (yes I know what you’re thinking about the name) will be making around 700 hp, just like the 911 GT2RS. This upcoming electric Macan also begs a different question: Which cars will Porsche electrify next?

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From a business standpoint, it seems reasonable, and probable that Porsche will further modify the Taycan’s J1 platform to accommodate an actual sports car, a 718 perhaps? Like the Macan, it’s also been rumored that Porsche will be electrifying the 718 twins so I don’t think it’s that far fetched to assume that the J1 platform is Porsche’s first step to making electric sports car. Anyway, let me know what you think. Is an electric Macan just another fast SUV, or the first step in Porsche’s electric car world domination?

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!

Is the Porsche 911 Still a True Sports Car?

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Photo Credit: HERE

The Porsche 911 has long had a reputation of being [in a German accent],”The world’s most favorite sports car.” Over time, that reputation has not changed one bit but the 911 itself has. With each generation, the 911 has gotten heavier, wider, more comfortable, etc. Take the 991 for example. The 991 911 was better in every measurable way than its predecessor,  the 997. It was faster, sharper, wider, lower, and got better gas mileage. But although it was a better car, was it a better sports car?

To begin, we have to define what a sports car is. By definition, a sports car is “a low built car designed for performance at high speeds.” As car enthusiasts, we can all agree that there’s more to this. In my opinion, a sports car is a car built with the driving experience as the only priority; everything else is an afterthought. A perfect example of this would be the 986 Boxster. The first gen Boxster was impractical, got terrible gas mileage, the engine frequently blew up, the interior smelled funny, it was a terrible car to drive daily. Despite all these drawbacks, it still remains one of the most fun and enjoyable cars to drive on a canyon road. The reason for this was simple, its only purpose was to be driven hard on a canyon road. It just wasn’t built for sitting in traffic and taking the kids to school every day. The 986 Boxster was a true sports car.

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The 911 is in essence the same. It started off as a true, no compromise sports car, but at the years went on, it became more and more comfortable, wider, longer, and more practical. Up until the 997 generation, this really wasn’t a problem. I mean, the 997.2 was just as fun to drive as any other 911, but it was also a really nice car. After that though, things changed. I keep using the 991 as an example since it was really the first time a 911 could be a legitimate daily driver. All you had to do was put the PDK transmission in automatic mode, turn on the AC, and cruise. Every 911 after the 991 followed this pattern, they became less 986 Boxster and more BMW M6. This was great for the Beverly Hills housewife who wanted to show off her new Porsche convertible, but it took away the raw, uncompromised nature Porsche purists had fallen in love with.

So here’s where the answer to our initial question comes. Is the Porsche 911 still a true sports car? Kind of. I say this because compared to the 911s of old, the 992 is not a sports car. It’s 8 speed PDK, comfy ride, and touch screens simply cannot match the raw, uncompromised, mechanical driving dynamic of older 911 models. But, and there’s a BIG but, compared to the “sports cars” of today, the new 911 is the most engaging, raw, and driver focused sports car you can buy. Despite all the changes and revisions over the years, the 911 hasn’t lost its true roots; at least not as much as its competitors. The BMW M3 for example, is a completely different car now than it was 15 years ago. 15 years ago we had the legendary E46 M3. A car with no compromises, a legendary engine, and one of the best driving dynamics ever implemented into a road car. Modern M4s simply can’t compete in terms of driving experience, the only thing the cars have in common is their lineage; otherwise, they’re as different as Ferrari and Fiat. Compare this to a 996 911 and a 992. Sure the 996 might feel better and more engaging to drive, but you can tell that the 992 is still a 911.

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Porsche’s aim with the 911 has always been evolution instead of revolution and I think that’s saved them in the long run because in all honestly, a no compromise sports car simply would not sell as well as a more luxurious counterpart. What Porsche has done with the 992 is that they’ve built a sports car for 2019, not 1999.

As always, THANK YOU FOR READING and come back next Sunday for a brand new article. Don’t forget to follow us on WordPress and share this article with your friends! Follow us on Instagram at rsreportblog and check out our Facebook Group, Porsche Enthusiasts United. Feel free to suggest new topics in the Contact Page. Newly added on the contact page is a link to the Porsche Club of America website which you should definitely check out HERE! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to come back next Sunday!